Lagged effects of active coping within the demand-control model: A three-wave panel study among Japanese employees

Akihito Shimazu, Jan De Jonge, Hirohiko Irimajiri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: There have been few empirical studies to explain the individual differences in and the underlying mechanism behind the Job Demand-Control (DC) Model. Purpose: This study examined the lagged effects of active coping on stress responses (i.e., psychological distress and physical complaints) in the context of the DC Model using three-wave panel survey data with intervals of one month. Method: Participants were 193 employees working in a construction machinery company in Japan. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were conducted to examine whether or not the effectiveness of active coping would be facilitated by job control as a coping resource. Results: The advantage of job control in combination with active coping became obvious after one month, which implies that job control has a delayed effect on coping effectiveness. However, the advantage disappeared after two months. These results suggest that the advantage of job control for active coping is limited in time. Conclusion: Conceptualization of job control as a coping resource seems to be useful in explaining how the DC Model influences employees' health, where time plays an important role.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)44-53
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Behavioral Medicine
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Jan 1
Externally publishedYes

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Occupational Health
Individuality
Japan
Regression Analysis
Psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Active coping
  • Coping resource
  • Demand-Control Model
  • Job control
  • Multi-wave study

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Lagged effects of active coping within the demand-control model : A three-wave panel study among Japanese employees. / Shimazu, Akihito; De Jonge, Jan; Irimajiri, Hirohiko.

In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, Vol. 15, No. 1, 01.01.2008, p. 44-53.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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