Last but not least

Akiyoshi Kitaoka, Jiro Gyoba, Kenzo Sakurai, Hideaki Kawabata

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Here we draw attention to similarity between Petter's effect and the visual phantom illusion. Phantoms are visible when the spatial frequency of the inducing grating is low or the occluder is thin, whereas phantoms are invisible when the spatial frequency of the inducing grating is high or the occluder is thick. Moreover, phantoms are perceived in front of the occluder when they are visible, whereas the occluder is seen in front of the inducing gratings when phantoms are invisible. These characteristics correspond to Petter's effect, in which the thicker region tends to be perceived in front of the thinner region when two regions of the same lightness and of different sizes overlap, since 'thick' corresponds to low spatial frequency of the inducing grating or a thick occluder while 'thin' corresponds to high spatial frequency of the inducing grating or a thin occluder.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)519-522
Number of pages4
JournalPerception
Volume30
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001 Dec 1

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Artificial Intelligence

Cite this

Kitaoka, A., Gyoba, J., Sakurai, K., & Kawabata, H. (2001). Last but not least. Perception, 30(4), 519-522. https://doi.org/10.1068/p3004no