LED light characteristics for surgical shadowless lamps and surgical loupes

Takeshi Ide, Yoshitaka Kinugawa, Yuichi Nobae, Toshihiro Suzuki, Yoshiyuki Tanaka, Ikuko Toda, Kazuo Tsubota

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Blue light has more energy than longer wavelength light and can penetrate the eye to reach the retina. When surgeons use magnifying loupes under intensive surgical shadowless lamps for better view of the surgical field, the total luminance is about 200 times brighter than that of typical office lighting. In this study, the effects of 2 types of shadowless lamps were compared. Moreover, the effect of various eyeglasses, which support magnifying loupes, on both the light energy and color rendering was considered. Methods: The light intensity and color rendering were measured on 3 variables: light transmittance, light intensity, and color rendering. Results: Under shadowless lamps, the light energy increased with low-magnification loupes and decreased with high-magnification loupes. Filtering eyeglasses reduced the energy, especially in conditions where the lowmagnification loupe was used. The best color-rendering index values were obtained with computer eyeglasses under conventional light-emitting diode shadowless lamps and with no glass and with lightly yellow-tinted lenses under less-blue light-emitting diode. Conclusions: Microsurgeons are exposed to strong lighting throughout their career, and proper color rendering must be considered for easier recognition. Light toxicity and loss of color rendering can be reduced with an appropriate combination of shadowless lamps and colored eyeglasses.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere562
JournalPlastic and Reconstructive Surgery - Global Open
Volume3
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jan 1

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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