Lifestyle and work predictors of fatigue in Japanese manufacturing workers

Shin Yamazaki, Shunichi Fukuhara, Yoshimi Suzukamo, Satoshi Morita, Tomonori Okamura, Taichiro Tanaka, Hirotsugu Ueshima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Fatigue is one of the most common symptoms encountered in medical practice. However, little is known about the causal relationship between change in lifestyle and fatigue. Aim: To help prevent fatigue-related disorders, we investigated the association between changes in lifestyle and fatigue among employees. Methods: We studied data sets from the High-risk and Population Strategy for Occupational Health Promotion study for employees at 10 workplaces in Japan. The baseline survey was done in 1999 and the follow-up survey in 2003 via a questionnaire which examined lifestyle and fatigue variables using the vitality domain scale of the SF-36 Health Survey. The lifestyle factors focused on were diet, smoking and alcohol habits and working conditions. Four-year changes in lifestyle that predicted the vitality domain score in the follow-up survey were examined by analysis of covariance. Results: Of the 6284 participants in the baseline survey, 4507 replied to the follow-up survey, of whom 3498, with a mean age of 37 (SD 18) years, returned valid responses. A low vitality score at follow-up was predicted by a change in lifestyle factors such as an increase in overtime work, change to non-sedentary work and increased frequency of eating between meals (P < 0.01, P < 0.01 and P = 0.02, respectively). Conclusion: Fatigue in salaried workers as measured by the vitality domain of the SF-36 is predicted by an increase in overtime work, change to non-sedentary work and an increase in the frequency of eating between meals.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)262-269
Number of pages8
JournalOccupational Medicine
Volume57
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Jun
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Fatigue
Life Style
Meals
Eating
Occupational Health
Health Surveys
Health Promotion
Workplace
Habits
Surveys and Questionnaires
Japan
Smoking
Alcohols
Diet
Population

Keywords

  • Fatigue
  • Lifestyle
  • Quality of life
  • Vitality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Yamazaki, S., Fukuhara, S., Suzukamo, Y., Morita, S., Okamura, T., Tanaka, T., & Ueshima, H. (2007). Lifestyle and work predictors of fatigue in Japanese manufacturing workers. Occupational Medicine, 57(4), 262-269. https://doi.org/10.1093/occmed/kqm006

Lifestyle and work predictors of fatigue in Japanese manufacturing workers. / Yamazaki, Shin; Fukuhara, Shunichi; Suzukamo, Yoshimi; Morita, Satoshi; Okamura, Tomonori; Tanaka, Taichiro; Ueshima, Hirotsugu.

In: Occupational Medicine, Vol. 57, No. 4, 06.2007, p. 262-269.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yamazaki, S, Fukuhara, S, Suzukamo, Y, Morita, S, Okamura, T, Tanaka, T & Ueshima, H 2007, 'Lifestyle and work predictors of fatigue in Japanese manufacturing workers', Occupational Medicine, vol. 57, no. 4, pp. 262-269. https://doi.org/10.1093/occmed/kqm006
Yamazaki, Shin ; Fukuhara, Shunichi ; Suzukamo, Yoshimi ; Morita, Satoshi ; Okamura, Tomonori ; Tanaka, Taichiro ; Ueshima, Hirotsugu. / Lifestyle and work predictors of fatigue in Japanese manufacturing workers. In: Occupational Medicine. 2007 ; Vol. 57, No. 4. pp. 262-269.
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