Limitation of cigarette consumption by CYP2A6*4, *7 and *9 polymorphisms

N. Minematsu, H. Nakamura, M. Furuuchi, T. Nakajima, S. Takahashi, H. Tateno, A. Ishizaka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The whole gene deletion CYP2A6*4, the defect of the main nicotine oxidase, contributes to limiting lifelong and daily cigarette consumption. However, the effects on smoking habits of CYP2A6*7 and *9, two major functional polymorphisms common in Asian populations, have not been reported. The present study examined the relationship between polymorphisms *4, *7 and *9 with the smoking habits of 200 Japanese smokers who visited the Keio University Hospital (Tokyo, Japan). The allele frequencies of *1 (wild type), *4, *7 and *9 were 52, 17, 11 and 20%, respectively. When the three polymorphisms were considered simultaneously, the percentages of homozygous wild type, heterozygote, and homozygous mutants and compound heterozygotes were 26.0, 52.5 and 21.5%, respectively. Homozygous mutants and compound heterozygotes (n=43) smoked fewer cigarettes daily than heterozygotes (n=105) and homozygous wild-type individuals (n=52). Smokers with *7/*7, *9/*9 or *7/*9 had lower daily cigarette consumption than smokers with *1/*1. In conclusion, polymorphisms *4, *7 and *9 of CYP2A6 were detected in approximately three out of four Japanese smokers, and their daily cigarette consumption was genetically modulated by these functional polymorphisms. Copyright

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)289-292
Number of pages4
JournalEuropean Respiratory Journal
Volume27
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006 Feb

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Heterozygote
Tobacco Products
Habits
Smoking
Tokyo
Gene Deletion
Gene Frequency
Japan
Population

Keywords

  • CYP2A6
  • Genetic polymorphism
  • Nicotine
  • Smoking habit

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Minematsu, N., Nakamura, H., Furuuchi, M., Nakajima, T., Takahashi, S., Tateno, H., & Ishizaka, A. (2006). Limitation of cigarette consumption by CYP2A6*4, *7 and *9 polymorphisms. European Respiratory Journal, 27(2), 289-292. https://doi.org/10.1183/09031936.06.00056305

Limitation of cigarette consumption by CYP2A6*4, *7 and *9 polymorphisms. / Minematsu, N.; Nakamura, H.; Furuuchi, M.; Nakajima, T.; Takahashi, S.; Tateno, H.; Ishizaka, A.

In: European Respiratory Journal, Vol. 27, No. 2, 02.2006, p. 289-292.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Minematsu, N, Nakamura, H, Furuuchi, M, Nakajima, T, Takahashi, S, Tateno, H & Ishizaka, A 2006, 'Limitation of cigarette consumption by CYP2A6*4, *7 and *9 polymorphisms', European Respiratory Journal, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 289-292. https://doi.org/10.1183/09031936.06.00056305
Minematsu N, Nakamura H, Furuuchi M, Nakajima T, Takahashi S, Tateno H et al. Limitation of cigarette consumption by CYP2A6*4, *7 and *9 polymorphisms. European Respiratory Journal. 2006 Feb;27(2):289-292. https://doi.org/10.1183/09031936.06.00056305
Minematsu, N. ; Nakamura, H. ; Furuuchi, M. ; Nakajima, T. ; Takahashi, S. ; Tateno, H. ; Ishizaka, A. / Limitation of cigarette consumption by CYP2A6*4, *7 and *9 polymorphisms. In: European Respiratory Journal. 2006 ; Vol. 27, No. 2. pp. 289-292.
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