Limited internal radiation exposure associated with resettlements to a radiation-contaminated homeland after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster

Masaharu Tsubokura, Shigeaki Kato, Masahiko Nihei, Yu Sakuma, Tomoyuki Furutani, Keisuke Uehara, Amina Sugimoto, Shuhei Nomura, Ryugo Hayano, Masahiro Kami, Hajime Watanobe, Yukou Endo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Resettlement to their radiation-contaminated hometown could be an option for people displaced at the time of a nuclear disaster; however, little information is available on the safety implications of these resettlement programs. Kawauchi village, located 12-30 km southwest of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, was one of the 11 municipalities where mandatory evacuation was ordered by the central government. This village was also the first municipality to organize the return of the villagers. To assess the validity of the Kawauchi villagers' resettlement program, the levels of internal Cesium (Cs) exposures were comparatively measured in returnees, commuters, and non-returnees among the Kawauchi villagers using a whole body counter. Of 149 individuals, 5 villagers had traceable levels of Cs exposure; the median detected level was 333 Bq/body (range, 309-1050 Bq/kg), and 5.3 Bq/kg (range, 5.1-18.2 Bq/kg). Median annual effective doses of villagers with traceable Cs were 1.1 × 10-2 mSv/y (range, 1.0 × 10-2-4.1 × 10-2 mSv/y). Although returnees had higher chances of consuming locally produced vegetables, Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test showed that their level of internal radiation exposure was not significantly higher than that in the other 2 groups (p=0.643). The present findings in Kawauchi village imply that it is possible to maintain internal radiation exposure at very low levels even in a highly radiation-contaminated region at the time of a nuclear disaster. Moreover, the risks for internal radiation exposure could be limited with a strict food control intervention after resettlement to the radiation-contaminated village. It is crucial to establish an adequate number of radio-contaminated testing sites within the village, to provide immediate test result feedback to the villagers, and to provide education regarding the importance of re-testing in reducing the risk of high internal radiation exposure.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere81909
JournalPLoS One
Volume8
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Dec 2

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Fukushima Nuclear Accident
disasters
Disasters
Cesium
villages
cesium
Radiation
Whole-Body Counting
Nuclear Power Plants
testing
Radio
nuclear power
Vegetables
power plants
radio
food safety
education
Safety
Education
Food

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

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Limited internal radiation exposure associated with resettlements to a radiation-contaminated homeland after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster. / Tsubokura, Masaharu; Kato, Shigeaki; Nihei, Masahiko; Sakuma, Yu; Furutani, Tomoyuki; Uehara, Keisuke; Sugimoto, Amina; Nomura, Shuhei; Hayano, Ryugo; Kami, Masahiro; Watanobe, Hajime; Endo, Yukou.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 8, No. 12, e81909, 02.12.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tsubokura, Masaharu ; Kato, Shigeaki ; Nihei, Masahiko ; Sakuma, Yu ; Furutani, Tomoyuki ; Uehara, Keisuke ; Sugimoto, Amina ; Nomura, Shuhei ; Hayano, Ryugo ; Kami, Masahiro ; Watanobe, Hajime ; Endo, Yukou. / Limited internal radiation exposure associated with resettlements to a radiation-contaminated homeland after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster. In: PLoS One. 2013 ; Vol. 8, No. 12.
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