Liquid-liquid biphasic synthesis of layered zinc hydroxides intercalated with long-chain carboxylate ions and their conversion into ZnO nanostructures

Sara Inoue, Shinobu Fujihara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A method for synthesizing layered zinc hydroxide compounds in high yields is developed using an immiscible liquid-liquid system in one pot. Long-chain carboxylate ions such as heptanoate, decanoate, and dodecanoate were successfully intercalated between zinc hydroxide layers in one process starting from a xylene-water system. Typically, a xylene phase dissolving the respective carboxylic acids was allowed to stand in contact with an aqueous phase dissolving zinc nitrate hexahydrate and urea. During keeping the resultant biphasic system at 80 °C, urea was thermo-hydrolyzed to supply OH - in the aqueous phase while the carboxylic acids were continuously transferred from the xylene phase under the distribution law. The aqueous phase was then supersaturated, and a solid phase of layered basic zinc carboxylate was precipitated as films on glass substrates through heterogeneous nucleation and subsequent two-dimensional crystal growth. Crystal structures and morphology of the films were modulated by the kind of the carboxylic acids employed. The layered basic zinc carboxylate films could be converted to nanostructured, mesoporous ZnO films by heating at 450 °C in air. The relationship between the initial solution compositions and the final solid products was systematically examined to discuss reaction mechanisms in the biphasic systems.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3605-3612
Number of pages8
JournalInorganic Chemistry
Volume50
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Apr 18

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Inorganic Chemistry

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