Local order and human security after the proliferation of automatic rifles in East Africa

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This chapter describes how pastoralists in East Africa, operating under a state without the capacity or will to protect its subjects, restored local order after the proliferation of automatic rifles. Dozens of ethnic groups in the arid and semi-arid areas of East Africa depend primarily on livestock (cattle, camel, sheep, goat and donkey) herding for their subsistence. These pastoralists are among the most marginalised peoples in East Africa and face grave threats to their human security. The majority of citizens in East Africa regard peripheral pastoralists as primitive, savage and warlike. The chapter argues that state-sponsored disarmament tends to increase the public's vulnerability to natural and social changes. It also argues that the proliferation of (semi-) automatic rifles such as the AK47 and G3 has increased the seriousness of conflicts. The chapter briefly describes how the relationship between the Daasanach and the Nyangatom changed after the proliferation of automatic rifles.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationNew Perspectives on Human Security
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages250-258
Number of pages9
ISBN (Electronic)9781351278799
ISBN (Print)9781906093419
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Jan 1
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance(all)
  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)
  • Social Sciences(all)

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