Local pharmacy pharmacists’ responses to the prescription of drugs that influence driving

Taizo Nagata, Junichi Yamada, Hitoshi Oohara, Junko Kizu

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

In 2013, the Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare issued a notification regarding drugs that influence driving. Afterward, a questionnaire survey of these drugs was conducted involving health insurance pharmacies in Tokyo and Shiga Prefectures. As a result, 503 (Tokyo) and 116 (Shiga) pharmacies provided completed questionnaires. The notification was su‹ciently and slightly recognized by 20% and 44% of the surveyed pharmacies, respectively, and drugs with a driving-related warning were recognized by 31% of the pharmacies. In addition, 23% of the pharmacies reported that they always asked patients whether they drive. The influence on driving of antianxiety drugs, hypnotics, antiepileptics, and smoking-cessation drugs was always explained to patients by 74%, 72%, 64%, and 40% of the pharmacies, respectively. Concerning responses to the prescription of drugs influencing driving, the proportion of surveyed pharmacies in Tokyo and Shiga Prefectures that directed patients not to drive was 71% and 53%, respectively, and that directed patients to stop driving on developing any symptom was 32% and 49%. Tokyo and Shiga Prefectures showed a significant difference in the reason for not prohibiting driving; the proportion of pharmacies that regarded strict medication adherence as of major importance to treat patients' primary diseases was 22% and 43%, respectively. This difference might have been attributable to a high percentage of patients (80%) driving to pharmacies in Shiga Prefecture. To facilitate the prescription of drugs influencing driving, it is recommended to design drug-specific pharmaceutical education manuals that also give consideration to patients’ QOL.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)323-328
Number of pages6
JournalYakugaku Zasshi
Volume137
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Fingerprint

Prescription Drugs
Pharmacies
Pharmacists
Tokyo
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Pharmacy Education
Medication Adherence
Drug Design
Smoking Cessation
Health Insurance
Hypnotics and Sedatives
Anticonvulsants
Health

Keywords

  • Driving-related warning
  • Package insert
  • Pharmacy
  • Prescription medication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmaceutical Science

Cite this

Local pharmacy pharmacists’ responses to the prescription of drugs that influence driving. / Nagata, Taizo; Yamada, Junichi; Oohara, Hitoshi; Kizu, Junko.

In: Yakugaku Zasshi, Vol. 137, No. 3, 2017, p. 323-328.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Nagata, Taizo ; Yamada, Junichi ; Oohara, Hitoshi ; Kizu, Junko. / Local pharmacy pharmacists’ responses to the prescription of drugs that influence driving. In: Yakugaku Zasshi. 2017 ; Vol. 137, No. 3. pp. 323-328.
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