Localized lesions of ventral striatum, but not arcopallium, enhanced impulsiveness in choices based on anticipated spatial proximity of food rewards in domestic chicks

Naoya Aoki, Ryuhei Suzuki, Eiichi Izawa, András Csillag, Toshiya Matsushima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effects of bilateral chemical lesions of the ventral striatum (nucleus accumbens and the surrounding areas in the medial striatum) and arcopallium (major descending area of the avian telencephalon) were examined in 1-2-weeks old domestic chicks. Using a Y-maze, we analyzed the lesion effects on the choices that subject chicks made in two tasks with identical economical consequences, i.e., a small-and-close food reward vs. a large-and-distant food reward. In task 1, red, yellow, and green beads were associated with a feeder placed at various distances from the chicks; chicks thus anticipated the spatial proximity of food by the bead's color, whereas the quantity of the food was fixed. In task 2, red and yellow flags on the feeders were associated with various amount of food; the chicks thus anticipated the quantity of food by the flag's color, whereas the proximity of the reward could be directly visually determined. In task 1, bilateral lesions of the ventral striatum (but not the arcopallium) enhanced the impulsiveness of the chicks' choices, suggesting that choices based on the anticipated proximity were selectively changed. In task 2, similar lesions of the ventral striatum did not change choices. In both experiments, motor functions of the chicks remained unchanged, suggesting that the lesions did not affect the foraging efficiency, i.e., objective values of food. Neural correlates of anticipated food rewards in the ventral striatum (but not those in the arcopallium) could allow chicks to invest appropriate amount of work-cost in approaching distant food resources.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-12
Number of pages12
JournalBehavioural Brain Research
Volume168
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006 Mar 15

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Reward
Food
Color
Ventral Striatum
Telencephalon
Nucleus Accumbens
Efficiency
Costs and Cost Analysis

Keywords

  • Basal ganglia
  • Caudate putamen
  • Decision making
  • Lobus parolfactorius
  • Medial striatum
  • Nucleus accumbens
  • Self control
  • Work-cost

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Localized lesions of ventral striatum, but not arcopallium, enhanced impulsiveness in choices based on anticipated spatial proximity of food rewards in domestic chicks. / Aoki, Naoya; Suzuki, Ryuhei; Izawa, Eiichi; Csillag, András; Matsushima, Toshiya.

In: Behavioural Brain Research, Vol. 168, No. 1, 15.03.2006, p. 1-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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