Long-term effects of a recession at labor market entry in japan and the United States

Yuji Genda, Ayako Kondo, Souichi Ohta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

79 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examine effects of entering the labor market during a recession on subsequent employment and earnings for Japanese and American men, using comparable household labor force surveys. We find persistent negative effects of the unemployment rate at graduation for less-educated Japanese men, in contrast to temporary effects for less-educated American men. The school-based hiring system and the dismissal regulation prolong the initial loss of employment opportunities for less-educated Japanese men. The effect on earnings for more-educated groups is also stronger in Japan, although the difference between the two countries is smaller than for less-educated groups.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)157-196
Number of pages40
JournalJournal of Human Resources
Volume45
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Dec

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Personnel
Japan
Market entry
Labour market
Recession
Labor force
Unemployment rate
Graduation
Household
Hiring

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Management of Technology and Innovation
  • Strategy and Management

Cite this

Long-term effects of a recession at labor market entry in japan and the United States. / Genda, Yuji; Kondo, Ayako; Ohta, Souichi.

In: Journal of Human Resources, Vol. 45, No. 1, 12.2010, p. 157-196.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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