Low binding capacity and altered O-linked glycosylation of low density lipoprotein receptor in a monensin-resistant mutant of Chinese hamster ovary cells.

Akihiko Yoshimura, T. Yoshida, T. Seguchi, M. Waki, M. Ono, M. Kuwano

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Abstract

We have studied function and structure of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors in a monensin-resistant (Monr-31) mutant isolated from Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. To assay the ability of the receptor to bind LDL, we employed three methods, 125I-LDL binding to the cells at 4 degrees C, 125I-LDL binding to the receptor-phospholipid complex (Schneider, W.J., Goldstein, J.L., and Brown, M.S. (1980) J. Biol. Chem. 255, 11442-11447), and ligand blotting (Daniel, T.O., Schneider, W.J., Goldstein, J.L., and Brown, M.S. (1983) J. Biol. Chem. 258, 4606-4611). The LDL receptor number was similar in both CHO and Monr-31, but the binding affinity was reduced in the mutant. The semi-quantitative immunoblotting assay with an antibody directed against the COOH-terminal 14 amino acids and the ligand-blotting assay with LDL also showed that the relative steady-state level of the receptor in Monr-31 was comparable to that in CHO, whereas the binding capacity of the receptor in Monr-31 was lower than that in CHO. The precursor and degradation forms of the LDL receptors produced in the mutant cells were similar in size to those in the parental cells, but the apparent molecular mass of the mature receptor protein in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels was reduced about 5000 daltons in the mutant. These results suggest a structural change at the NH2-terminal LDL binding domain. Tests of the effects of tunicamycin, endo-alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (O-glycanase), and sialidase (neuraminidase) on the molecular size of the mature receptors indicated that the reduced size of the receptor in the mutant cells resulted from altered oligosaccharide chain(s) linked to serine/threonine residues in the binding domain. We compared the molecular sizes and binding activity of human LDL receptors in several clones derived from CHO and Monr-31 cells which were transfected with human LDL receptor cDNA. The human LDL receptors produced in the transfected clones of Monr-31 were also smaller in molecular size and lower in binding capacity than those produced in the transfected clones of CHO. These results suggest that both structural and functional alteration of the LDL receptor of Monr-31 is not caused by a mutation in the structural gene of the LDL receptor but by altered processing or maturation of the receptor. The correlation of the decrease in molecular size and reduced binding capacity of the LDL receptor is discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)13299-13308
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume262
Issue number27
Publication statusPublished - 1987 Sep 25
Externally publishedYes

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Glycosylation
Monensin
LDL Receptors
Cricetulus
Ovary
LDL Lipoproteins
Cells
Assays
Clone Cells
Neuraminidase
alpha-N-Acetylgalactosaminidase
Ligands
Tunicamycin
Molecular mass
Threonine
Oligosaccharides
Immunoblotting
Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate
Serine
Phospholipids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Low binding capacity and altered O-linked glycosylation of low density lipoprotein receptor in a monensin-resistant mutant of Chinese hamster ovary cells. / Yoshimura, Akihiko; Yoshida, T.; Seguchi, T.; Waki, M.; Ono, M.; Kuwano, M.

In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 262, No. 27, 25.09.1987, p. 13299-13308.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Kuwano, M.

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