Low birth weight is associated with decline in renal function in Japanese male and female adolescents

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Abstract

Background: Low birth weight (LBW) is a risk factor for chronic kidney disease (CKD) in later life and is becoming increasingly common in developed countries, including Japan. Furthermore, a serial decrease in birth weight has been associated with an increasing prevalence of CKD stage 2 in male Japanese adolescents. Sex-specific differences affect CKD susceptibility, and the association between birth weight and CKD in women, has not been elucidated. In this study, we investigated the sex-specific effect of LBW on renal function. Methods: Annual cross-sectional data of 2417 Japanese adolescents (males 1736; females 681), aged 15–16 years, were evaluated over 8 years (2007–2014). Results: Over the study period, mean birth weights decreased significantly in males (p < 0.01) and females (p < 0.05). Furthermore, both sexes showed significant decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rates corresponding to the birth weight reduction. The prevalence of CKD stage 2 also increased in males (from 26.0 to 32.4%, p < 0.01) and females (from 6.3 to 18.5%, p < 0.05). The incidence of CKD stage 2 was significantly related to history of LBW (males: odds ratio 1.73; 95% confidence interval 1.06–2.80; p < 0.05; females: odds ratio 3.29; 95% confidence interval 1.25–8.02; p < 0.05). Conclusions: Our data revealed that renal function and birth weight have decreased over time, in healthy Japanese adolescents. In view of the recent declining trend demonstrated by birth weight in Japan, we speculate that the prevalence of CKD might increase in the future.

Original languageEnglish
JournalClinical and experimental nephrology
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2019 Jan 1

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Low Birth Weight Infant
Chronic Renal Insufficiency
Birth Weight
Kidney
Japan
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Disease Susceptibility
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Developed Countries
Sex Characteristics
Weight Loss
Incidence

Keywords

  • eGFR
  • Low birth weight
  • Sex differences

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Nephrology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

@article{a5acfb68b20942adb39d4edf59be80cb,
title = "Low birth weight is associated with decline in renal function in Japanese male and female adolescents",
abstract = "Background: Low birth weight (LBW) is a risk factor for chronic kidney disease (CKD) in later life and is becoming increasingly common in developed countries, including Japan. Furthermore, a serial decrease in birth weight has been associated with an increasing prevalence of CKD stage 2 in male Japanese adolescents. Sex-specific differences affect CKD susceptibility, and the association between birth weight and CKD in women, has not been elucidated. In this study, we investigated the sex-specific effect of LBW on renal function. Methods: Annual cross-sectional data of 2417 Japanese adolescents (males 1736; females 681), aged 15–16 years, were evaluated over 8 years (2007–2014). Results: Over the study period, mean birth weights decreased significantly in males (p < 0.01) and females (p < 0.05). Furthermore, both sexes showed significant decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rates corresponding to the birth weight reduction. The prevalence of CKD stage 2 also increased in males (from 26.0 to 32.4{\%}, p < 0.01) and females (from 6.3 to 18.5{\%}, p < 0.05). The incidence of CKD stage 2 was significantly related to history of LBW (males: odds ratio 1.73; 95{\%} confidence interval 1.06–2.80; p < 0.05; females: odds ratio 3.29; 95{\%} confidence interval 1.25–8.02; p < 0.05). Conclusions: Our data revealed that renal function and birth weight have decreased over time, in healthy Japanese adolescents. In view of the recent declining trend demonstrated by birth weight in Japan, we speculate that the prevalence of CKD might increase in the future.",
keywords = "eGFR, Low birth weight, Sex differences",
author = "Ayano Murai-Takeda and Takeshi Kanda and Tatsuhiko Azegami and Hiroshi Hirose and Mikako Inokuchi and Hirobumi Tokuyama and Shu Wakino and Mitsuaki Tokumura and Hiroshi Kawabe and Masaaki Mori and Hiroshi Itoh",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s10157-019-01784-9",
language = "English",
journal = "Clinical and Experimental Nephrology",
issn = "1342-1751",
publisher = "Springer Japan",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Low birth weight is associated with decline in renal function in Japanese male and female adolescents

AU - Murai-Takeda, Ayano

AU - Kanda, Takeshi

AU - Azegami, Tatsuhiko

AU - Hirose, Hiroshi

AU - Inokuchi, Mikako

AU - Tokuyama, Hirobumi

AU - Wakino, Shu

AU - Tokumura, Mitsuaki

AU - Kawabe, Hiroshi

AU - Mori, Masaaki

AU - Itoh, Hiroshi

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Background: Low birth weight (LBW) is a risk factor for chronic kidney disease (CKD) in later life and is becoming increasingly common in developed countries, including Japan. Furthermore, a serial decrease in birth weight has been associated with an increasing prevalence of CKD stage 2 in male Japanese adolescents. Sex-specific differences affect CKD susceptibility, and the association between birth weight and CKD in women, has not been elucidated. In this study, we investigated the sex-specific effect of LBW on renal function. Methods: Annual cross-sectional data of 2417 Japanese adolescents (males 1736; females 681), aged 15–16 years, were evaluated over 8 years (2007–2014). Results: Over the study period, mean birth weights decreased significantly in males (p < 0.01) and females (p < 0.05). Furthermore, both sexes showed significant decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rates corresponding to the birth weight reduction. The prevalence of CKD stage 2 also increased in males (from 26.0 to 32.4%, p < 0.01) and females (from 6.3 to 18.5%, p < 0.05). The incidence of CKD stage 2 was significantly related to history of LBW (males: odds ratio 1.73; 95% confidence interval 1.06–2.80; p < 0.05; females: odds ratio 3.29; 95% confidence interval 1.25–8.02; p < 0.05). Conclusions: Our data revealed that renal function and birth weight have decreased over time, in healthy Japanese adolescents. In view of the recent declining trend demonstrated by birth weight in Japan, we speculate that the prevalence of CKD might increase in the future.

AB - Background: Low birth weight (LBW) is a risk factor for chronic kidney disease (CKD) in later life and is becoming increasingly common in developed countries, including Japan. Furthermore, a serial decrease in birth weight has been associated with an increasing prevalence of CKD stage 2 in male Japanese adolescents. Sex-specific differences affect CKD susceptibility, and the association between birth weight and CKD in women, has not been elucidated. In this study, we investigated the sex-specific effect of LBW on renal function. Methods: Annual cross-sectional data of 2417 Japanese adolescents (males 1736; females 681), aged 15–16 years, were evaluated over 8 years (2007–2014). Results: Over the study period, mean birth weights decreased significantly in males (p < 0.01) and females (p < 0.05). Furthermore, both sexes showed significant decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rates corresponding to the birth weight reduction. The prevalence of CKD stage 2 also increased in males (from 26.0 to 32.4%, p < 0.01) and females (from 6.3 to 18.5%, p < 0.05). The incidence of CKD stage 2 was significantly related to history of LBW (males: odds ratio 1.73; 95% confidence interval 1.06–2.80; p < 0.05; females: odds ratio 3.29; 95% confidence interval 1.25–8.02; p < 0.05). Conclusions: Our data revealed that renal function and birth weight have decreased over time, in healthy Japanese adolescents. In view of the recent declining trend demonstrated by birth weight in Japan, we speculate that the prevalence of CKD might increase in the future.

KW - eGFR

KW - Low birth weight

KW - Sex differences

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U2 - 10.1007/s10157-019-01784-9

DO - 10.1007/s10157-019-01784-9

M3 - Article

C2 - 31494799

AN - SCOPUS:85073936162

JO - Clinical and Experimental Nephrology

JF - Clinical and Experimental Nephrology

SN - 1342-1751

ER -