Low-intensity light induces vasomotion

Yuji Morimoto, Makoto Kikuchi, Hirotaka Matsuo, Tsunenori Arai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

To investigate the mechanism of light induced vasomotion, we studied vascular tension change in normal buffer solution. The results showed that the light induced vasocontraction may have been due to thermal effect of the light, however, the vasorelaxation was not caused by the thermogenesis. We conclude that primary photochemical product, which is probably nitric oxide originated from photodissociation of nitro groups, may produce the vasorelaxation. This preliminary investigation suggests that ultraviolet irradiation may be available to treatment for vasospasm.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)283-284
Number of pages2
JournalMedical and Biological Engineering and Computing
Volume34
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
Publication statusPublished - 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Light
Vasodilation
Photodissociation
Thermogenesis
Nitric oxide
Thermal effects
Blood Vessels
Buffers
Nitric Oxide
Hot Temperature
Irradiation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computational Theory and Mathematics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Health Informatics
  • Health Information Management

Cite this

Morimoto, Y., Kikuchi, M., Matsuo, H., & Arai, T. (1996). Low-intensity light induces vasomotion. Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing, 34(SUPPL. 1), 283-284.

Low-intensity light induces vasomotion. / Morimoto, Yuji; Kikuchi, Makoto; Matsuo, Hirotaka; Arai, Tsunenori.

In: Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing, Vol. 34, No. SUPPL. 1, 1996, p. 283-284.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Morimoto, Y, Kikuchi, M, Matsuo, H & Arai, T 1996, 'Low-intensity light induces vasomotion', Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing, vol. 34, no. SUPPL. 1, pp. 283-284.
Morimoto Y, Kikuchi M, Matsuo H, Arai T. Low-intensity light induces vasomotion. Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing. 1996;34(SUPPL. 1):283-284.
Morimoto, Yuji ; Kikuchi, Makoto ; Matsuo, Hirotaka ; Arai, Tsunenori. / Low-intensity light induces vasomotion. In: Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing. 1996 ; Vol. 34, No. SUPPL. 1. pp. 283-284.
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