Macronutrient Intake and Socioeconomic Status: NIPPON DATA2010

Masaru Sakurai, Hideaki Nakagawa, Aya Kadota, Katsushi Yoshita, Yasuyuki Nakamura, Nagako Okuda, Nobuo Nishi, Yoshihiro Miyamoto, Hisatomi Arima, Takayoshi Ohkubo, Tomonori Okamura, Hirotsugu Ueshima, Akira Okayama, Katsuyuki Miura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: This study examined the relationships among household income, other SES indicators, and macronutrient intake in a cross-sectional study of a representative Japanese population.

METHODS: In 2010, we established a cohort of participants in the National Health and Nutrition Survey (NHNS) from 300 randomly selected areas throughout Japan. A total of 2,637 participants (1,145 men and 1,492 women) were included in the study. Data from NHNS2010 and the Comprehensive Survey of Living Conditions 2010 (CSCL2010) were merged, and relationships among macronutrient intake and SES were evaluated. Additionally, socioeconomic factors associated with a risk of a higher carbohydrate/lower fat intake beyond dietary recommendations were evaluated.

RESULTS: Household income was positively associated with fat intake (P = 0.001 for men and <0.001 for women) and inversely associated with carbohydrate intake (P = 0.003 for men and <0.001 for women) after adjustments for age and other SES variables. Similar relationships were observed between equivalent household expenditure (EHE) and macronutrient intake; however, these relationships were weaker than those of household income. Older age was the factor most strongly associated with a high carbohydrate/low fat intake, followed by household income, EHE, education levels, and occupation type.

CONCLUSIONS: Older age was the factor most strongly associated with a high carbohydrate/low fat intake, and some aspects of SES, such as household income, EHE, education levels, and occupation type, were independently associated with an imbalanced macronutrient intake. SES may affect the health status of individuals through the intake of macronutrients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S17-S22
JournalJournal of Epidemiology
Volume28
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Jan 1

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Social Class
Health Expenditures
Fats
Carbohydrates
Age Factors
Occupations
Education
Nutrition Surveys
Social Conditions
Health Surveys
Health Status
Japan
Cross-Sectional Studies
Population

Keywords

  • household income
  • macronutrient intake
  • nutritional epidemiology
  • socioeconomic status

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Sakurai, M., Nakagawa, H., Kadota, A., Yoshita, K., Nakamura, Y., Okuda, N., ... Miura, K. (2018). Macronutrient Intake and Socioeconomic Status: NIPPON DATA2010. Journal of Epidemiology, 28, S17-S22. https://doi.org/10.2188/jea.JE20170250

Macronutrient Intake and Socioeconomic Status : NIPPON DATA2010. / Sakurai, Masaru; Nakagawa, Hideaki; Kadota, Aya; Yoshita, Katsushi; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Okuda, Nagako; Nishi, Nobuo; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro; Arima, Hisatomi; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Okamura, Tomonori; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Okayama, Akira; Miura, Katsuyuki.

In: Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 28, 01.01.2018, p. S17-S22.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sakurai, M, Nakagawa, H, Kadota, A, Yoshita, K, Nakamura, Y, Okuda, N, Nishi, N, Miyamoto, Y, Arima, H, Ohkubo, T, Okamura, T, Ueshima, H, Okayama, A & Miura, K 2018, 'Macronutrient Intake and Socioeconomic Status: NIPPON DATA2010', Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 28, pp. S17-S22. https://doi.org/10.2188/jea.JE20170250
Sakurai M, Nakagawa H, Kadota A, Yoshita K, Nakamura Y, Okuda N et al. Macronutrient Intake and Socioeconomic Status: NIPPON DATA2010. Journal of Epidemiology. 2018 Jan 1;28:S17-S22. https://doi.org/10.2188/jea.JE20170250
Sakurai, Masaru ; Nakagawa, Hideaki ; Kadota, Aya ; Yoshita, Katsushi ; Nakamura, Yasuyuki ; Okuda, Nagako ; Nishi, Nobuo ; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro ; Arima, Hisatomi ; Ohkubo, Takayoshi ; Okamura, Tomonori ; Ueshima, Hirotsugu ; Okayama, Akira ; Miura, Katsuyuki. / Macronutrient Intake and Socioeconomic Status : NIPPON DATA2010. In: Journal of Epidemiology. 2018 ; Vol. 28. pp. S17-S22.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND: This study examined the relationships among household income, other SES indicators, and macronutrient intake in a cross-sectional study of a representative Japanese population.METHODS: In 2010, we established a cohort of participants in the National Health and Nutrition Survey (NHNS) from 300 randomly selected areas throughout Japan. A total of 2,637 participants (1,145 men and 1,492 women) were included in the study. Data from NHNS2010 and the Comprehensive Survey of Living Conditions 2010 (CSCL2010) were merged, and relationships among macronutrient intake and SES were evaluated. Additionally, socioeconomic factors associated with a risk of a higher carbohydrate/lower fat intake beyond dietary recommendations were evaluated.RESULTS: Household income was positively associated with fat intake (P = 0.001 for men and <0.001 for women) and inversely associated with carbohydrate intake (P = 0.003 for men and <0.001 for women) after adjustments for age and other SES variables. Similar relationships were observed between equivalent household expenditure (EHE) and macronutrient intake; however, these relationships were weaker than those of household income. Older age was the factor most strongly associated with a high carbohydrate/low fat intake, followed by household income, EHE, education levels, and occupation type.CONCLUSIONS: Older age was the factor most strongly associated with a high carbohydrate/low fat intake, and some aspects of SES, such as household income, EHE, education levels, and occupation type, were independently associated with an imbalanced macronutrient intake. SES may affect the health status of individuals through the intake of macronutrients.",
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AU - Okuda, Nagako

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AU - Ohkubo, Takayoshi

AU - Okamura, Tomonori

AU - Ueshima, Hirotsugu

AU - Okayama, Akira

AU - Miura, Katsuyuki

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N2 - BACKGROUND: This study examined the relationships among household income, other SES indicators, and macronutrient intake in a cross-sectional study of a representative Japanese population.METHODS: In 2010, we established a cohort of participants in the National Health and Nutrition Survey (NHNS) from 300 randomly selected areas throughout Japan. A total of 2,637 participants (1,145 men and 1,492 women) were included in the study. Data from NHNS2010 and the Comprehensive Survey of Living Conditions 2010 (CSCL2010) were merged, and relationships among macronutrient intake and SES were evaluated. Additionally, socioeconomic factors associated with a risk of a higher carbohydrate/lower fat intake beyond dietary recommendations were evaluated.RESULTS: Household income was positively associated with fat intake (P = 0.001 for men and <0.001 for women) and inversely associated with carbohydrate intake (P = 0.003 for men and <0.001 for women) after adjustments for age and other SES variables. Similar relationships were observed between equivalent household expenditure (EHE) and macronutrient intake; however, these relationships were weaker than those of household income. Older age was the factor most strongly associated with a high carbohydrate/low fat intake, followed by household income, EHE, education levels, and occupation type.CONCLUSIONS: Older age was the factor most strongly associated with a high carbohydrate/low fat intake, and some aspects of SES, such as household income, EHE, education levels, and occupation type, were independently associated with an imbalanced macronutrient intake. SES may affect the health status of individuals through the intake of macronutrients.

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KW - nutritional epidemiology

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