Masked Isolated Nocturnal Hypertension in Children and Young Adults

Hisayo Fujita, Seiji Matsuoka, Midori Awazu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Isolated nocturnal hypertension (INH) is characterized by normal daytime blood pressure (BP) and elevated nighttime BP diagnosed by ambulatory BP monitoring. Masked isolated nocturnal hypertension (MINH) is a subtype of INH in which office BP is normal. We studied the frequency and characteristics of INH and MINH in children and young adults. One hundred and ninety-eight subjects seen by the pediatric nephrology service were studied retrospectively. Isolated nocturnal hypertension (INH) and MINH were diagnosed according to daytime and nighttime ABP and office BP in the case of the latter. One hundred and eighteen subjects (60%) had normotension, 6 (3%) had isolated daytime hypertension, 32 (16%) had INH, and 42 (21%) had day–night hypertension. Sixteen subjects had MINH (8.1%). The underlying diseases of MINH were as follows: no underlying disease 9 (56%), renal disease 6 (38%), and endocrine disease 1 (6%). There was no significant difference in the underlying disease, gender, age, and BMI between MINH and INH with elevated office BP. In conclusion, MINH is present in children and young adults. Since there were no specific features for MINH, screening with ambulatory or home BP monitoring during sleep may be appropriate.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-5
Number of pages5
JournalPediatric Cardiology
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2017 Sep 25

Fingerprint

Young Adult
Hypertension
Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring
Blood Pressure
Masked Hypertension
Endocrine System Diseases
Nephrology
Sleep
Pediatrics
Kidney

Keywords

  • Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring
  • Children
  • Isolated nocturnal hypertension
  • Masked isolated nocturnal hypertension
  • Nighttime blood pressure
  • Target organ damage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Masked Isolated Nocturnal Hypertension in Children and Young Adults. / Fujita, Hisayo; Matsuoka, Seiji; Awazu, Midori.

In: Pediatric Cardiology, 25.09.2017, p. 1-5.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fujita, Hisayo ; Matsuoka, Seiji ; Awazu, Midori. / Masked Isolated Nocturnal Hypertension in Children and Young Adults. In: Pediatric Cardiology. 2017 ; pp. 1-5.
@article{3929d9a8c4f842b6b2e724a54c3b7a83,
title = "Masked Isolated Nocturnal Hypertension in Children and Young Adults",
abstract = "Isolated nocturnal hypertension (INH) is characterized by normal daytime blood pressure (BP) and elevated nighttime BP diagnosed by ambulatory BP monitoring. Masked isolated nocturnal hypertension (MINH) is a subtype of INH in which office BP is normal. We studied the frequency and characteristics of INH and MINH in children and young adults. One hundred and ninety-eight subjects seen by the pediatric nephrology service were studied retrospectively. Isolated nocturnal hypertension (INH) and MINH were diagnosed according to daytime and nighttime ABP and office BP in the case of the latter. One hundred and eighteen subjects (60{\%}) had normotension, 6 (3{\%}) had isolated daytime hypertension, 32 (16{\%}) had INH, and 42 (21{\%}) had day–night hypertension. Sixteen subjects had MINH (8.1{\%}). The underlying diseases of MINH were as follows: no underlying disease 9 (56{\%}), renal disease 6 (38{\%}), and endocrine disease 1 (6{\%}). There was no significant difference in the underlying disease, gender, age, and BMI between MINH and INH with elevated office BP. In conclusion, MINH is present in children and young adults. Since there were no specific features for MINH, screening with ambulatory or home BP monitoring during sleep may be appropriate.",
keywords = "Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, Children, Isolated nocturnal hypertension, Masked isolated nocturnal hypertension, Nighttime blood pressure, Target organ damage",
author = "Hisayo Fujita and Seiji Matsuoka and Midori Awazu",
year = "2017",
month = "9",
day = "25",
doi = "10.1007/s00246-017-1728-0",
language = "English",
pages = "1--5",
journal = "Pediatric Cardiology",
issn = "0172-0643",
publisher = "Springer New York",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Masked Isolated Nocturnal Hypertension in Children and Young Adults

AU - Fujita, Hisayo

AU - Matsuoka, Seiji

AU - Awazu, Midori

PY - 2017/9/25

Y1 - 2017/9/25

N2 - Isolated nocturnal hypertension (INH) is characterized by normal daytime blood pressure (BP) and elevated nighttime BP diagnosed by ambulatory BP monitoring. Masked isolated nocturnal hypertension (MINH) is a subtype of INH in which office BP is normal. We studied the frequency and characteristics of INH and MINH in children and young adults. One hundred and ninety-eight subjects seen by the pediatric nephrology service were studied retrospectively. Isolated nocturnal hypertension (INH) and MINH were diagnosed according to daytime and nighttime ABP and office BP in the case of the latter. One hundred and eighteen subjects (60%) had normotension, 6 (3%) had isolated daytime hypertension, 32 (16%) had INH, and 42 (21%) had day–night hypertension. Sixteen subjects had MINH (8.1%). The underlying diseases of MINH were as follows: no underlying disease 9 (56%), renal disease 6 (38%), and endocrine disease 1 (6%). There was no significant difference in the underlying disease, gender, age, and BMI between MINH and INH with elevated office BP. In conclusion, MINH is present in children and young adults. Since there were no specific features for MINH, screening with ambulatory or home BP monitoring during sleep may be appropriate.

AB - Isolated nocturnal hypertension (INH) is characterized by normal daytime blood pressure (BP) and elevated nighttime BP diagnosed by ambulatory BP monitoring. Masked isolated nocturnal hypertension (MINH) is a subtype of INH in which office BP is normal. We studied the frequency and characteristics of INH and MINH in children and young adults. One hundred and ninety-eight subjects seen by the pediatric nephrology service were studied retrospectively. Isolated nocturnal hypertension (INH) and MINH were diagnosed according to daytime and nighttime ABP and office BP in the case of the latter. One hundred and eighteen subjects (60%) had normotension, 6 (3%) had isolated daytime hypertension, 32 (16%) had INH, and 42 (21%) had day–night hypertension. Sixteen subjects had MINH (8.1%). The underlying diseases of MINH were as follows: no underlying disease 9 (56%), renal disease 6 (38%), and endocrine disease 1 (6%). There was no significant difference in the underlying disease, gender, age, and BMI between MINH and INH with elevated office BP. In conclusion, MINH is present in children and young adults. Since there were no specific features for MINH, screening with ambulatory or home BP monitoring during sleep may be appropriate.

KW - Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring

KW - Children

KW - Isolated nocturnal hypertension

KW - Masked isolated nocturnal hypertension

KW - Nighttime blood pressure

KW - Target organ damage

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85029807254&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85029807254&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00246-017-1728-0

DO - 10.1007/s00246-017-1728-0

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85029807254

SP - 1

EP - 5

JO - Pediatric Cardiology

JF - Pediatric Cardiology

SN - 0172-0643

ER -