Mechanical intermittent compression affects the progression rate of malignant melanoma cells in a cycle period-dependent manner

Takashi Morikura, Shogo Miyata

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Static mechanical compression is a biomechanical factor that affects the progression of melanoma cells. However, little is known about how dynamic mechanical compression affects the progression of melanoma cells. In the present study, we show that mechanical intermittent compression affects the progression rate of malignant melanoma cells in a cycle period-dependent manner. Our results suggest that intermittent compression with a cycle of 2 h on/2 h off could suppress the progression rate of melanoma cells by suppressing the elongation of F-actin filaments and mRNA expression levels related to collagen degradation. In contrast, intermittent compression with a cycle of 4 h on/4 h off could promote the progression rate of melanoma cells by promoting cell proliferation and mRNA expression levels related to collagen degradation. Mechanical intermittent compression could therefore affect the progression rate of malignant melanoma cells in a cycle period-dependent manner. Our results contribute to a deeper understanding of the physiological responses of melanoma cells to dynamic mechanical compression.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1112
JournalDiagnostics
Volume11
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 Jun

Keywords

  • Cancer progression
  • In vitro model
  • Malignant melanoma
  • Mechanical intermittent compression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Biochemistry

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Mechanical intermittent compression affects the progression rate of malignant melanoma cells in a cycle period-dependent manner'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this