Mental health of Japanese psychiatrists: The relationship among level of occupational stress, satisfaction and depressive symptoms

Akihiro Koreki, Atsuo Nakagawa, Akiko Abe, Hidetsugu Ikeuchi, Jo Okubo, Atsushi Oguri, Keisuke Orimo, Nariko Katayama, Hiroyo Sato, Ryo Shikimoto, Go Nishiyama, Waka Nogami, Kazuma Haki, Tetsuro Hayashi, Yuko Fukagawa, Kei Funaki, Mia Matsuzawa, Ayako Matsumoto, Masaru Mimura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Psychiatrists in clinical practice face a number of stressors related to patient care, such as overwork. On the other hand, they gain satisfaction from their work. We quantified and assessed the potential relationship between levels of occupational stress, satisfaction, and depressive symptoms among Japanese clinical psychiatrists. We surveyed 206 psychiatrists with up to 15 years of clinical experience who primarily worked in patient care. Levels of occupational stress and occupational satisfaction were measured using the Visual Analogue Scale and the level of depressive symptoms was measured by the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Workplace stressors and satisfiers were also evaluated. Results: Out of 206 psychiatrists, 154 (74.8%) responded to the survey. The respondents' mean (SD) age was 34.3 (5.2) years. The estimated prevalence of significant depressive symptoms was 34.4% (n=53), and the experienced frequent violence was 14.9% (n=23). The level of depressive symptoms was inversely correlated with the level of occupational satisfaction. In respondents who reported a moderate level of occupational stress, having fewer depressive symptoms was associated with higher occupational satisfaction, but this association was not significant in those who reported a high level of stress. In addition, high occupational satisfaction was associated with interest towards work content, ability to work at one's discretion, opportunities for growth and career development, and ease of communication with supervisors and colleagues. Conclusions: Nearly one-third of the psychiatrists screened positive for significant depressive symptoms. Having fewer depressive symptoms was associated with higher occupational satisfaction in those who reported a moderate level of stress. Implications from the present findings may be to enhance occupational satisfaction by discussing work interests with a supervisor, as well as increased opportunities for career development, which may prevent depression among psychiatrists.

Original languageEnglish
Article number96
JournalBMC Research Notes
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Mar 26

Fingerprint

Psychiatry
Mental Health
Health
Depression
Supervisory personnel
Job Satisfaction
Patient Care
Aptitude
Visual Analog Scale
Growth and Development
Violence
Workplace
Epidemiologic Studies
Communication
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Depression
  • Occupational satisfaction
  • Resilience
  • Stress
  • Workplace

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Mental health of Japanese psychiatrists : The relationship among level of occupational stress, satisfaction and depressive symptoms. / Koreki, Akihiro; Nakagawa, Atsuo; Abe, Akiko; Ikeuchi, Hidetsugu; Okubo, Jo; Oguri, Atsushi; Orimo, Keisuke; Katayama, Nariko; Sato, Hiroyo; Shikimoto, Ryo; Nishiyama, Go; Nogami, Waka; Haki, Kazuma; Hayashi, Tetsuro; Fukagawa, Yuko; Funaki, Kei; Matsuzawa, Mia; Matsumoto, Ayako; Mimura, Masaru.

In: BMC Research Notes, Vol. 8, No. 1, 96, 26.03.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Koreki, A, Nakagawa, A, Abe, A, Ikeuchi, H, Okubo, J, Oguri, A, Orimo, K, Katayama, N, Sato, H, Shikimoto, R, Nishiyama, G, Nogami, W, Haki, K, Hayashi, T, Fukagawa, Y, Funaki, K, Matsuzawa, M, Matsumoto, A & Mimura, M 2015, 'Mental health of Japanese psychiatrists: The relationship among level of occupational stress, satisfaction and depressive symptoms', BMC Research Notes, vol. 8, no. 1, 96. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13104-015-1054-7
Koreki, Akihiro ; Nakagawa, Atsuo ; Abe, Akiko ; Ikeuchi, Hidetsugu ; Okubo, Jo ; Oguri, Atsushi ; Orimo, Keisuke ; Katayama, Nariko ; Sato, Hiroyo ; Shikimoto, Ryo ; Nishiyama, Go ; Nogami, Waka ; Haki, Kazuma ; Hayashi, Tetsuro ; Fukagawa, Yuko ; Funaki, Kei ; Matsuzawa, Mia ; Matsumoto, Ayako ; Mimura, Masaru. / Mental health of Japanese psychiatrists : The relationship among level of occupational stress, satisfaction and depressive symptoms. In: BMC Research Notes. 2015 ; Vol. 8, No. 1.
@article{3c2273519aa94a36a721c8a2bc86d786,
title = "Mental health of Japanese psychiatrists: The relationship among level of occupational stress, satisfaction and depressive symptoms",
abstract = "Background: Psychiatrists in clinical practice face a number of stressors related to patient care, such as overwork. On the other hand, they gain satisfaction from their work. We quantified and assessed the potential relationship between levels of occupational stress, satisfaction, and depressive symptoms among Japanese clinical psychiatrists. We surveyed 206 psychiatrists with up to 15 years of clinical experience who primarily worked in patient care. Levels of occupational stress and occupational satisfaction were measured using the Visual Analogue Scale and the level of depressive symptoms was measured by the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Workplace stressors and satisfiers were also evaluated. Results: Out of 206 psychiatrists, 154 (74.8{\%}) responded to the survey. The respondents' mean (SD) age was 34.3 (5.2) years. The estimated prevalence of significant depressive symptoms was 34.4{\%} (n=53), and the experienced frequent violence was 14.9{\%} (n=23). The level of depressive symptoms was inversely correlated with the level of occupational satisfaction. In respondents who reported a moderate level of occupational stress, having fewer depressive symptoms was associated with higher occupational satisfaction, but this association was not significant in those who reported a high level of stress. In addition, high occupational satisfaction was associated with interest towards work content, ability to work at one's discretion, opportunities for growth and career development, and ease of communication with supervisors and colleagues. Conclusions: Nearly one-third of the psychiatrists screened positive for significant depressive symptoms. Having fewer depressive symptoms was associated with higher occupational satisfaction in those who reported a moderate level of stress. Implications from the present findings may be to enhance occupational satisfaction by discussing work interests with a supervisor, as well as increased opportunities for career development, which may prevent depression among psychiatrists.",
keywords = "Depression, Occupational satisfaction, Resilience, Stress, Workplace",
author = "Akihiro Koreki and Atsuo Nakagawa and Akiko Abe and Hidetsugu Ikeuchi and Jo Okubo and Atsushi Oguri and Keisuke Orimo and Nariko Katayama and Hiroyo Sato and Ryo Shikimoto and Go Nishiyama and Waka Nogami and Kazuma Haki and Tetsuro Hayashi and Yuko Fukagawa and Kei Funaki and Mia Matsuzawa and Ayako Matsumoto and Masaru Mimura",
year = "2015",
month = "3",
day = "26",
doi = "10.1186/s13104-015-1054-7",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
journal = "BMC Research Notes",
issn = "1756-0500",
publisher = "BioMed Central",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mental health of Japanese psychiatrists

T2 - The relationship among level of occupational stress, satisfaction and depressive symptoms

AU - Koreki, Akihiro

AU - Nakagawa, Atsuo

AU - Abe, Akiko

AU - Ikeuchi, Hidetsugu

AU - Okubo, Jo

AU - Oguri, Atsushi

AU - Orimo, Keisuke

AU - Katayama, Nariko

AU - Sato, Hiroyo

AU - Shikimoto, Ryo

AU - Nishiyama, Go

AU - Nogami, Waka

AU - Haki, Kazuma

AU - Hayashi, Tetsuro

AU - Fukagawa, Yuko

AU - Funaki, Kei

AU - Matsuzawa, Mia

AU - Matsumoto, Ayako

AU - Mimura, Masaru

PY - 2015/3/26

Y1 - 2015/3/26

N2 - Background: Psychiatrists in clinical practice face a number of stressors related to patient care, such as overwork. On the other hand, they gain satisfaction from their work. We quantified and assessed the potential relationship between levels of occupational stress, satisfaction, and depressive symptoms among Japanese clinical psychiatrists. We surveyed 206 psychiatrists with up to 15 years of clinical experience who primarily worked in patient care. Levels of occupational stress and occupational satisfaction were measured using the Visual Analogue Scale and the level of depressive symptoms was measured by the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Workplace stressors and satisfiers were also evaluated. Results: Out of 206 psychiatrists, 154 (74.8%) responded to the survey. The respondents' mean (SD) age was 34.3 (5.2) years. The estimated prevalence of significant depressive symptoms was 34.4% (n=53), and the experienced frequent violence was 14.9% (n=23). The level of depressive symptoms was inversely correlated with the level of occupational satisfaction. In respondents who reported a moderate level of occupational stress, having fewer depressive symptoms was associated with higher occupational satisfaction, but this association was not significant in those who reported a high level of stress. In addition, high occupational satisfaction was associated with interest towards work content, ability to work at one's discretion, opportunities for growth and career development, and ease of communication with supervisors and colleagues. Conclusions: Nearly one-third of the psychiatrists screened positive for significant depressive symptoms. Having fewer depressive symptoms was associated with higher occupational satisfaction in those who reported a moderate level of stress. Implications from the present findings may be to enhance occupational satisfaction by discussing work interests with a supervisor, as well as increased opportunities for career development, which may prevent depression among psychiatrists.

AB - Background: Psychiatrists in clinical practice face a number of stressors related to patient care, such as overwork. On the other hand, they gain satisfaction from their work. We quantified and assessed the potential relationship between levels of occupational stress, satisfaction, and depressive symptoms among Japanese clinical psychiatrists. We surveyed 206 psychiatrists with up to 15 years of clinical experience who primarily worked in patient care. Levels of occupational stress and occupational satisfaction were measured using the Visual Analogue Scale and the level of depressive symptoms was measured by the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Workplace stressors and satisfiers were also evaluated. Results: Out of 206 psychiatrists, 154 (74.8%) responded to the survey. The respondents' mean (SD) age was 34.3 (5.2) years. The estimated prevalence of significant depressive symptoms was 34.4% (n=53), and the experienced frequent violence was 14.9% (n=23). The level of depressive symptoms was inversely correlated with the level of occupational satisfaction. In respondents who reported a moderate level of occupational stress, having fewer depressive symptoms was associated with higher occupational satisfaction, but this association was not significant in those who reported a high level of stress. In addition, high occupational satisfaction was associated with interest towards work content, ability to work at one's discretion, opportunities for growth and career development, and ease of communication with supervisors and colleagues. Conclusions: Nearly one-third of the psychiatrists screened positive for significant depressive symptoms. Having fewer depressive symptoms was associated with higher occupational satisfaction in those who reported a moderate level of stress. Implications from the present findings may be to enhance occupational satisfaction by discussing work interests with a supervisor, as well as increased opportunities for career development, which may prevent depression among psychiatrists.

KW - Depression

KW - Occupational satisfaction

KW - Resilience

KW - Stress

KW - Workplace

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84928339598&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84928339598&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1186/s13104-015-1054-7

DO - 10.1186/s13104-015-1054-7

M3 - Article

C2 - 25885051

AN - SCOPUS:84928339598

VL - 8

JO - BMC Research Notes

JF - BMC Research Notes

SN - 1756-0500

IS - 1

M1 - 96

ER -