Microwave-assisted magnetization reversal using transient precession of magnetization in permalloy hexagons

Genki Okano, Yukio Nozaki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Microwave-assisted magnetization reversal utilizing a transient precession of magnetization was demonstrated in a permalloy hexagon by applying a 25-ns-wide microwave field and a 500-ps-wide pulsed field with a tunable delay to the microwave field. The switching field in a combination of these two fields becomes smaller than that in only the microwave field, and this additional reduction in switching field oscillates relative to the delay time. From the comparison with the results of micromagnetic simulations, we found that the oscillatory behavior is attributed to the beats in transient precession that occurs in the early stage of microwave-field-induced magnetization excitation.

Original languageEnglish
Article number063001
JournalApplied Physics Express
Volume9
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Jun 1

Fingerprint

Magnetization reversal
hexagons
Permalloys (trademark)
precession
Magnetization
Microwaves
microwaves
magnetization
synchronism
Time delay
time lag
excitation
simulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Microwave-assisted magnetization reversal using transient precession of magnetization in permalloy hexagons. / Okano, Genki; Nozaki, Yukio.

In: Applied Physics Express, Vol. 9, No. 6, 063001, 01.06.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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