Misconvergence to the stimulus plane causes apparent displacement of the stimulus elements seen monocularly

Sachio Nakamizo, Hideaki Kawabata, Hiroshi Ono

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

When one binocularly views a group of vertical lines through a ring, the outermost line segments (one on each side) seen within the ring are seen monocularly while the segments of the same lines outside the ring are seen binocularly. The monocular segments appear to be displaced outward with respect to the center of the ring and with respect to the corresponding binocular segments outside the ring. Three experiments examined the extent and direction of this illusory displacement as a function of viewing distance, fixation disparity created by varying the angles of the two arms of a haploscope, and fixation disparity created by a stereoscope and different Nonius stimuli. The results of the experiments confirmed the hypothesis that the apparent displacement is due to misconvergence in accordance with Wells-Hering's laws of visual direction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)49-62
Number of pages14
JournalJapanese Psychological Research
Volume50
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Mar 1
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Apparent displacement
  • Fixation disparity
  • Misconvergence
  • Wells-Hering's laws of visual direction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

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