Modified metacarpal shortening osteotomy of the midcarpal bone for preserving metacarpophalangeal joints in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

Kensuke Ochi, Yu Sakuma, Osamu Ishida, Koichiro Yano, Shinji Yoshida, Takuma Koyama, Mina Ishibashi, Katsunori Ikari, Shigeki Momohara

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Abstract

Recent advances in medication choices have strikingly improved the management of rheumatoid arthritis. However, medication alone cannot place back already deformed joints. Thus, to prevent metacarpophalangeal (MP) joint destruction, joint deformity correction should be considered since mechanical stress induced by finger motions will eventually destruct the undestructed joint, with a possibility of recurrence and future implant arthroplasty in mind since RA still remains as a progressive disease. We report a modified metacarpal shortening osteotomy for correcting MP joint deformity. The advantage of our technique over previous osteotomies is that it easily allows for subsequent implant arthroplasty even after the recurrence of joint deformity/destruction. Major modifications include that the metacarpal is shortened at its mid-shaft and the osteotomy is performed vertical to the shaft and fixed with surgical wiring. We believe that combination therapy consisting of medication and surgery is preferable to prevent joint destruction, even in this age of biological agents.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)313-314
Number of pages2
JournalModern Rheumatology
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Mar 3

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Keywords

  • Metacarpophalangeal joints
  • Midcarpal
  • Osteotomy
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Shaft
  • Shortening osteotomy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology

Cite this

Ochi, K., Sakuma, Y., Ishida, O., Yano, K., Yoshida, S., Koyama, T., Ishibashi, M., Ikari, K., & Momohara, S. (2016). Modified metacarpal shortening osteotomy of the midcarpal bone for preserving metacarpophalangeal joints in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Modern Rheumatology, 26(2), 313-314. https://doi.org/10.3109/14397595.2015.1081338