Molecular mechanisms of fragile X syndrome.

S. B. Inoue, M. C. Siomi, Haruhiko Siomi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fragile X syndrome is the most common form of inherited mental retardation Mutations which abolish expression of an X-linked gene, FMR1, result in pathogenesis of the disease. FMR1 encodes a cytoplasmic RNA-binding protein which interacts with two autosomal homologs, FXR1 and FXR2. These proteins are highly expressed in neurons. In addition, the FMR1/FXR proteins are associated with ribosomes. Given their RNA-binding activity and association with ribosomes, these proteins are hypothesized to bind to specific RNAs and regulate their expression at translational levels in a manner critical for correct development of neurons. Much progress has been made in FMR1 research over the past several years, but little light has yet to be shed on the physiological function of these proteins. It will be critical to define the biochemical properties of these proteins, and identify potential downstream targets to clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying the potential roles of these proteins in translation. A basic understanding of the function of this new family of RNA-binding proteins should then allow us to begin to address the question of how the lack of FMR1 expression leads to symptoms in fragile X syndrome.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)101-107
Number of pages7
JournalThe journal of medical investigation : JMI
Volume47
Issue number3-4
Publication statusPublished - 2000 Aug
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Fragile X Syndrome
RNA-Binding Proteins
Proteins
Ribosomes
Neurons
RNA
X-Linked Genes
Protein Biosynthesis
Intellectual Disability
Light
Genes
Mutation
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Molecular mechanisms of fragile X syndrome. / Inoue, S. B.; Siomi, M. C.; Siomi, Haruhiko.

In: The journal of medical investigation : JMI, Vol. 47, No. 3-4, 08.2000, p. 101-107.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Inoue, S. B. ; Siomi, M. C. ; Siomi, Haruhiko. / Molecular mechanisms of fragile X syndrome. In: The journal of medical investigation : JMI. 2000 ; Vol. 47, No. 3-4. pp. 101-107.
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