Motion illusion activates the visual motion area of the brain

A near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) study

Teruo Hashimoto, Yasuyo Minagawa, Shozo Kojima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) enables noninvasive measurement of concentration changes of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin. The present study investigated cerebral representations of motion illusion by NIRS and examined several experimental procedures to determine an efficient procedure that can shorten the experimental time. We compared hemodynamic responses to figures with and without motion illusion. The number of repetitions of the tasks in the experiments and other factors were also examined. Results showed significant responses around area MT/V5 to the motion illusion from the analyses of three cycles (blocks) of presentation of illusion induction stimulus. These findings indicate that motion illusion can be detected by NIRS, and we propose a concise and efficient procedure for NIRS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)116-122
Number of pages7
JournalBrain Research
Volume1077
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006 Mar 10

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Near-Infrared Spectroscopy
Brain
Hemoglobins
Hemodynamics

Keywords

  • Motion illusion
  • MT/V5
  • Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)
  • Peripheral drift illusion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Motion illusion activates the visual motion area of the brain : A near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) study. / Hashimoto, Teruo; Minagawa, Yasuyo; Kojima, Shozo.

In: Brain Research, Vol. 1077, No. 1, 10.03.2006, p. 116-122.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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