Multifocal intraocular lens explantation: A case series of 50 eyes

Kazutaka Kamiya, Ken Hayashi, Kimiya Shimizu, Kazuno Negishi, Masaki Sato, Hiroko Bissen-Miyajima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objective To assess the visual complaints, reasons, and patient satisfaction for multifocal intraocular lens (IOL) explantation. Design Retrospective observational case series. Methods This study evaluated 50 eyes of 37 patients who underwent multifocal IOL explantation followed by IOL implantation. Before and 3 months after IOL exchange surgery, we investigated the symptoms, reasons, patient demographics, clinical results, and patient satisfaction in eyes undergoing multifocal IOL explantation. Data collected included preoperative subjective and objective findings, reasons, IOL type, postoperative course, and patient satisfaction. Results The most common complaints for IOL explantation were waxy vision, followed by glare and halos, blurred vision at far, dysphotopsia, blurred vision at near, and blurred vision at intermediate. The most common reasons for IOL explantation were decreased contrast sensitivity, followed by photic phenomenon, unknown origin including neuroadaptation failure, incorrect IOL power, preoperative excessive expectation, IOL dislocation/decentration, and anisometropia. The axial length was 25.13 ± 1.83 mm. Of the explanted multifocal IOLs, 84% were diffractive and 16% were refractive. Monofocal IOLs accounted for 90% of the exchanged IOLs. Patient satisfaction was significantly improved from 1.22 ± 0.55 preoperatively to 3.78 ± 0.97 postoperatively, which was graded on a scale of 1 (very dissatisfied) to 5 (very satisfied) (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, P <.001). Conclusions Multifocal IOL explantation was required in some patients undergoing multifocal IOL implantation. IOL exchange surgery appears to be a feasible surgical option for dissatisfied patients with persistent visual symptoms after multifocal IOL implantation.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAmerican Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume158
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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Intraocular Lenses
Patient Satisfaction
Intraocular Lens Implantation
Lens Subluxation
Anisometropia
Glare
Contrast Sensitivity
Nonparametric Statistics
Demography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Multifocal intraocular lens explantation : A case series of 50 eyes. / Kamiya, Kazutaka; Hayashi, Ken; Shimizu, Kimiya; Negishi, Kazuno; Sato, Masaki; Bissen-Miyajima, Hiroko.

In: American Journal of Ophthalmology, Vol. 158, No. 2, 2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kamiya, Kazutaka ; Hayashi, Ken ; Shimizu, Kimiya ; Negishi, Kazuno ; Sato, Masaki ; Bissen-Miyajima, Hiroko. / Multifocal intraocular lens explantation : A case series of 50 eyes. In: American Journal of Ophthalmology. 2014 ; Vol. 158, No. 2.
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