Multivariate analysis of the rise in home blood pressure by personal factors: A field survey on the effect of indoor thermal environment on blood pressure in winter

Wataru Umishio, Toshiharu Ikaga, Kuniaki Otsuka, Shintaro Ando

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Japan is confronted with the problems of an aging population, and government finances are severely strained by rising expenditures on medical and nursing care. It is expected that medical and nursing care expenses reached 45 trillion yen in 2010, and such expenses are expected to double to 92 trillion yen by 2025. An effective measure for lowering such expenditures is the prevention of cardiovascular disease, a major cause of which is hypertension. Recently, the effects of the indoor thermal environment on blood pressure have attracted attention. However, these effects have not been studied in relation to personal factors, particularly individual attributes and lifestyle. Therefore, the purpose of this research is to analyze the relation between indoor temperature and blood pressure while taking into account personal factors. Field surveys on home blood pressure, indoor temperature, and personal factors were conducted in winter 2012 and 2013. Controlling for personal factors, systolic blood pressure increased by 4.3 mmHg per 10 °C decrease in indoor air temperature. Also, a 1 °C decrease in indoor air temperature increased 1.1-fold the likelihood of a value above 135 mmHg (baseline for systolic blood pressure at home). Furthermore, the effect of indoor air temperature was stronger in residents with more severe arteriosclerosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)571-577
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Environmental Engineering (Japan)
Volume79
Issue number701
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Jul 1

Fingerprint

Blood pressure
Nursing
Temperature
Air
Finance
Aging of materials
Hot Temperature
Multivariate Analysis

Keywords

  • Field survey
  • Home bloodpressure
  • Indoor thermal environment
  • Lifestyle
  • Personal attribute
  • Region IV

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Engineering

Cite this

Multivariate analysis of the rise in home blood pressure by personal factors : A field survey on the effect of indoor thermal environment on blood pressure in winter. / Umishio, Wataru; Ikaga, Toshiharu; Otsuka, Kuniaki; Ando, Shintaro.

In: Journal of Environmental Engineering (Japan), Vol. 79, No. 701, 01.07.2014, p. 571-577.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{a4e6470179b749fd85789607093154f1,
title = "Multivariate analysis of the rise in home blood pressure by personal factors: A field survey on the effect of indoor thermal environment on blood pressure in winter",
abstract = "Japan is confronted with the problems of an aging population, and government finances are severely strained by rising expenditures on medical and nursing care. It is expected that medical and nursing care expenses reached 45 trillion yen in 2010, and such expenses are expected to double to 92 trillion yen by 2025. An effective measure for lowering such expenditures is the prevention of cardiovascular disease, a major cause of which is hypertension. Recently, the effects of the indoor thermal environment on blood pressure have attracted attention. However, these effects have not been studied in relation to personal factors, particularly individual attributes and lifestyle. Therefore, the purpose of this research is to analyze the relation between indoor temperature and blood pressure while taking into account personal factors. Field surveys on home blood pressure, indoor temperature, and personal factors were conducted in winter 2012 and 2013. Controlling for personal factors, systolic blood pressure increased by 4.3 mmHg per 10 °C decrease in indoor air temperature. Also, a 1 °C decrease in indoor air temperature increased 1.1-fold the likelihood of a value above 135 mmHg (baseline for systolic blood pressure at home). Furthermore, the effect of indoor air temperature was stronger in residents with more severe arteriosclerosis.",
keywords = "Field survey, Home bloodpressure, Indoor thermal environment, Lifestyle, Personal attribute, Region IV",
author = "Wataru Umishio and Toshiharu Ikaga and Kuniaki Otsuka and Shintaro Ando",
year = "2014",
month = "7",
day = "1",
language = "English",
volume = "79",
pages = "571--577",
journal = "Journal of Environmental Engineering (Japan)",
issn = "1348-0685",
publisher = "Architectural Institute of Japan",
number = "701",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Multivariate analysis of the rise in home blood pressure by personal factors

T2 - A field survey on the effect of indoor thermal environment on blood pressure in winter

AU - Umishio, Wataru

AU - Ikaga, Toshiharu

AU - Otsuka, Kuniaki

AU - Ando, Shintaro

PY - 2014/7/1

Y1 - 2014/7/1

N2 - Japan is confronted with the problems of an aging population, and government finances are severely strained by rising expenditures on medical and nursing care. It is expected that medical and nursing care expenses reached 45 trillion yen in 2010, and such expenses are expected to double to 92 trillion yen by 2025. An effective measure for lowering such expenditures is the prevention of cardiovascular disease, a major cause of which is hypertension. Recently, the effects of the indoor thermal environment on blood pressure have attracted attention. However, these effects have not been studied in relation to personal factors, particularly individual attributes and lifestyle. Therefore, the purpose of this research is to analyze the relation between indoor temperature and blood pressure while taking into account personal factors. Field surveys on home blood pressure, indoor temperature, and personal factors were conducted in winter 2012 and 2013. Controlling for personal factors, systolic blood pressure increased by 4.3 mmHg per 10 °C decrease in indoor air temperature. Also, a 1 °C decrease in indoor air temperature increased 1.1-fold the likelihood of a value above 135 mmHg (baseline for systolic blood pressure at home). Furthermore, the effect of indoor air temperature was stronger in residents with more severe arteriosclerosis.

AB - Japan is confronted with the problems of an aging population, and government finances are severely strained by rising expenditures on medical and nursing care. It is expected that medical and nursing care expenses reached 45 trillion yen in 2010, and such expenses are expected to double to 92 trillion yen by 2025. An effective measure for lowering such expenditures is the prevention of cardiovascular disease, a major cause of which is hypertension. Recently, the effects of the indoor thermal environment on blood pressure have attracted attention. However, these effects have not been studied in relation to personal factors, particularly individual attributes and lifestyle. Therefore, the purpose of this research is to analyze the relation between indoor temperature and blood pressure while taking into account personal factors. Field surveys on home blood pressure, indoor temperature, and personal factors were conducted in winter 2012 and 2013. Controlling for personal factors, systolic blood pressure increased by 4.3 mmHg per 10 °C decrease in indoor air temperature. Also, a 1 °C decrease in indoor air temperature increased 1.1-fold the likelihood of a value above 135 mmHg (baseline for systolic blood pressure at home). Furthermore, the effect of indoor air temperature was stronger in residents with more severe arteriosclerosis.

KW - Field survey

KW - Home bloodpressure

KW - Indoor thermal environment

KW - Lifestyle

KW - Personal attribute

KW - Region IV

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84907611984&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84907611984&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84907611984

VL - 79

SP - 571

EP - 577

JO - Journal of Environmental Engineering (Japan)

JF - Journal of Environmental Engineering (Japan)

SN - 1348-0685

IS - 701

ER -