Muscle tension dynamics of isolated frog muscle with application of perpendicular distortion

Mitsuyoshi Murayama, Tsugutake Yoneda, Sachio Kawai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to confirm the relationship between isolated frog muscle tension and muscle hardness by conducting physiological evaluation in vivo. Two different mounting forms of the muscle were adopted. One form placed the gastrocnemius muscle (GA) on a base plate; this dented the muscle as a "mass". The other form tightened the sartorius muscle (SA) between holders in Ringer's solution; this bent the muscle as a "string". The first experimental method allowed testing of muscle hardness during stretching up to 140% (experiment 1) and the other method allowed testing of hardness during tetanic muscle contraction (experiment 2). The response force to vertical distortion, measured as muscle hardness, increased linearly with resting tension increase and this relationship was not influenced by the hysteresis (experiment 1). The response force increments at each level of tetanic muscle tension were proportional to the contracting tension (experiment 2). Although the muscle mounting forms were different, the response force increment to muscle tension in GA and SA showed quite similar relationships in both tests. It seems likely that muscle hardness evaluated by the response force must depend on the amplitude of the tension at the instant of the hardness measurement, regardless of the mounting form or the stretching phase (ascending or descending). In conclusion, muscle hardness measured by perpendicular distortion has physiological significance related to the changes in passive and active muscle tension.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)489-495
Number of pages7
JournalEuropean Journal of Applied Physiology
Volume93
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005 Jan

Fingerprint

Muscle Tonus
Anura
Hardness
Muscles
Muscle Contraction
Skeletal Muscle

Keywords

  • Contractile tension
  • Gastrocnemius muscle
  • Muscle hardness
  • Resting tension
  • Sartorius muscle

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Physiology
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Muscle tension dynamics of isolated frog muscle with application of perpendicular distortion. / Murayama, Mitsuyoshi; Yoneda, Tsugutake; Kawai, Sachio.

In: European Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 93, No. 4, 01.2005, p. 489-495.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{f7020c73e1c54e0495fb1dbafb23533f,
title = "Muscle tension dynamics of isolated frog muscle with application of perpendicular distortion",
abstract = "The purpose of the present study was to confirm the relationship between isolated frog muscle tension and muscle hardness by conducting physiological evaluation in vivo. Two different mounting forms of the muscle were adopted. One form placed the gastrocnemius muscle (GA) on a base plate; this dented the muscle as a {"}mass{"}. The other form tightened the sartorius muscle (SA) between holders in Ringer's solution; this bent the muscle as a {"}string{"}. The first experimental method allowed testing of muscle hardness during stretching up to 140{\%} (experiment 1) and the other method allowed testing of hardness during tetanic muscle contraction (experiment 2). The response force to vertical distortion, measured as muscle hardness, increased linearly with resting tension increase and this relationship was not influenced by the hysteresis (experiment 1). The response force increments at each level of tetanic muscle tension were proportional to the contracting tension (experiment 2). Although the muscle mounting forms were different, the response force increment to muscle tension in GA and SA showed quite similar relationships in both tests. It seems likely that muscle hardness evaluated by the response force must depend on the amplitude of the tension at the instant of the hardness measurement, regardless of the mounting form or the stretching phase (ascending or descending). In conclusion, muscle hardness measured by perpendicular distortion has physiological significance related to the changes in passive and active muscle tension.",
keywords = "Contractile tension, Gastrocnemius muscle, Muscle hardness, Resting tension, Sartorius muscle",
author = "Mitsuyoshi Murayama and Tsugutake Yoneda and Sachio Kawai",
year = "2005",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s00421-004-1204-4",
language = "English",
volume = "93",
pages = "489--495",
journal = "European Journal of Applied Physiology",
issn = "1439-6319",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Muscle tension dynamics of isolated frog muscle with application of perpendicular distortion

AU - Murayama, Mitsuyoshi

AU - Yoneda, Tsugutake

AU - Kawai, Sachio

PY - 2005/1

Y1 - 2005/1

N2 - The purpose of the present study was to confirm the relationship between isolated frog muscle tension and muscle hardness by conducting physiological evaluation in vivo. Two different mounting forms of the muscle were adopted. One form placed the gastrocnemius muscle (GA) on a base plate; this dented the muscle as a "mass". The other form tightened the sartorius muscle (SA) between holders in Ringer's solution; this bent the muscle as a "string". The first experimental method allowed testing of muscle hardness during stretching up to 140% (experiment 1) and the other method allowed testing of hardness during tetanic muscle contraction (experiment 2). The response force to vertical distortion, measured as muscle hardness, increased linearly with resting tension increase and this relationship was not influenced by the hysteresis (experiment 1). The response force increments at each level of tetanic muscle tension were proportional to the contracting tension (experiment 2). Although the muscle mounting forms were different, the response force increment to muscle tension in GA and SA showed quite similar relationships in both tests. It seems likely that muscle hardness evaluated by the response force must depend on the amplitude of the tension at the instant of the hardness measurement, regardless of the mounting form or the stretching phase (ascending or descending). In conclusion, muscle hardness measured by perpendicular distortion has physiological significance related to the changes in passive and active muscle tension.

AB - The purpose of the present study was to confirm the relationship between isolated frog muscle tension and muscle hardness by conducting physiological evaluation in vivo. Two different mounting forms of the muscle were adopted. One form placed the gastrocnemius muscle (GA) on a base plate; this dented the muscle as a "mass". The other form tightened the sartorius muscle (SA) between holders in Ringer's solution; this bent the muscle as a "string". The first experimental method allowed testing of muscle hardness during stretching up to 140% (experiment 1) and the other method allowed testing of hardness during tetanic muscle contraction (experiment 2). The response force to vertical distortion, measured as muscle hardness, increased linearly with resting tension increase and this relationship was not influenced by the hysteresis (experiment 1). The response force increments at each level of tetanic muscle tension were proportional to the contracting tension (experiment 2). Although the muscle mounting forms were different, the response force increment to muscle tension in GA and SA showed quite similar relationships in both tests. It seems likely that muscle hardness evaluated by the response force must depend on the amplitude of the tension at the instant of the hardness measurement, regardless of the mounting form or the stretching phase (ascending or descending). In conclusion, muscle hardness measured by perpendicular distortion has physiological significance related to the changes in passive and active muscle tension.

KW - Contractile tension

KW - Gastrocnemius muscle

KW - Muscle hardness

KW - Resting tension

KW - Sartorius muscle

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=11344292788&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=11344292788&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00421-004-1204-4

DO - 10.1007/s00421-004-1204-4

M3 - Article

C2 - 15322854

AN - SCOPUS:11344292788

VL - 93

SP - 489

EP - 495

JO - European Journal of Applied Physiology

JF - European Journal of Applied Physiology

SN - 1439-6319

IS - 4

ER -