NAD+-dependent deacetylase SIRT3 in adipocytes is dispensable for maintaining normal adipose tissue mitochondrial function and whole body metabolism

Lane C. Porter, Michael P. Franczyk, Terri Pietka, Shintaro Yamaguchi, Jonathan B. Lin, Yo Sasaki, Eric Verdin, Rajendra S. Apte, Jun Yoshino

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mito-chondrial dysfunction in adipose tissue is involved in the pathophysiology of obesity-induced systemic metabolic complications, such as type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia. However, the mechanisms responsible for obesity-induced adipose tissue mitochondrial dysfunction are not clear. The aim of present study was to test the hypothesis that nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+)-depen-dent deacetylase sirtuin-3 (SIRT3) in adipocytes plays a critical role in adipose tissue mitochondrial biology and obesity. We first measured adipose tissue SIRT3 expression in obese and lean mice. Next, adipocyte-specific mitochondrial Sirt3 knockout (AMiSKO) mice were generated and metabolically characterized. We evaluated glucose and lipid metabolism in adult mice fed either a regular-chow diet or high-fat diet (HFD) and in aged mice. We also determined the effects of Sirt3 deletion on adipose tissue metabolism and mitochondrial biology. Supporting our hypothesis, obese mice had decreased SIRT3 gene and protein expression in adipose tissue. However, despite successful knockout of SIRT3, AMiSKO mice had normal glucose and lipid metabolism and did not change metabolic responses to HFD-feeding and aging. In addition, loss of SIRT3 had no major impact on putative SIRT3 targets, key metabolic pathways, and mitochondrial function in white and brown adipose tissue. Collectively, these findings suggest that adipocyte SIRT3 is dispensable for maintaining normal adipose tissue mitochondrial function and whole body metabolism. Contrary to our hypothesis, loss of SIRT3 function in adipocytes is unlikely to contribute to the pathophysiology of obesity-induced metabolic complications.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)E520-E530
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume315
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Oct

Keywords

  • Adipocyte
  • Adipose tissue
  • Glucose metabolism
  • Mitochondria
  • NAD+
  • Obesity
  • SIRT3

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

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