Nursing ward managers' perceptions of pain prevalence at the aged-care facilities in Japan: A nationwide survey

Yukari Takai, Noriko Yamamoto-Mitani, Hiroki Fukahori, Sayuri Kobayashi, Yumi Chiba

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study aimed to examine nursing ward managers' perceptions of pain prevalence among older residents and the strategies of pain management at the Health Service Facilities for the Elderly Requiring Care (HSFERC) in Japan and to investigate the factors related to the prevalence. Nursing ward managers in 3,644 HSFERC were asked to participate in this study. Questionnaires were sent to them regarding pain prevalence among the older residents in their wards, their provisions for pain care, and other pain management strategies. The perceived pain prevalence factors were examined statistically. The final sample comprised 439 participants (12.0%). A total of 5,219 residents (22.3%) were recognized as suffering from pain on the investigation day. Only 8 wards (1.8%) used pain management guidelines or care manuals, and 14 (3.2%) used a standardized pain scale. The ward managers' age (p = .008) and nursing experience (p = .006) showed a significant negative association with pain prevalence estimation. Moreover, there was a significant association between the groups' pain prevalence estimation and the nursing managers' beliefs that older adults were less sensitive to pain (p= .01), that pain was common among older people (p = .007), and that the time to treat residents' pain was insufficient (p = .001). The ward managers' perceptions regarding pain prevalence varied; the perceived pain rates were possibly lower than the actual percentages. Insufficient pain management strategies at the HSFERC were also suggested. An appropriate pain management strategy for Japanese aged care and its dissemination are urgently required.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPain Management Nursing
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Sep 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Pain Perception
Japan
Nursing
Pain
Pain Management
Health Services for the Aged
Health Facilities
Surveys and Questionnaires
Guidelines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Advanced and Specialised Nursing

Cite this

Nursing ward managers' perceptions of pain prevalence at the aged-care facilities in Japan : A nationwide survey. / Takai, Yukari; Yamamoto-Mitani, Noriko; Fukahori, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Sayuri; Chiba, Yumi.

In: Pain Management Nursing, Vol. 14, No. 3, 01.09.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Takai, Yukari ; Yamamoto-Mitani, Noriko ; Fukahori, Hiroki ; Kobayashi, Sayuri ; Chiba, Yumi. / Nursing ward managers' perceptions of pain prevalence at the aged-care facilities in Japan : A nationwide survey. In: Pain Management Nursing. 2013 ; Vol. 14, No. 3.
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