Oligosaccharide-based surfactant/citric acid buffer system stabilizes lactate dehydrogenase during freeze-drying and storage without the addition of natural sugar

Shigesaburo Ogawa, Ryuichiro Kawai, Maito Koga, Kouichi Asakura, Isao Takahashi, Shuichi Osanai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Experiments were conducted to assess the maintenance effects of oligosaccharide-based surfactants on the enzymatic activity of a model protein, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), during freeze-drying and room temperature storage using the citric acid buffer system. Oligosaccharide-based surfactants, which exhibit a high glass transition temperature (Tg), promoted the eminent retention of enzymatic activity during these protocols, whereas monosaccharide-based surfactants with a low Tg displayed poor performance at high concentration, albeit much better than that of Tween 80 at middle concentration. The increase in the alkyl chain length did not exert positive effects as observed for the maintenance effect during freeze-thawing, but an amphiphilic nature and a glass forming ability were crucial for the effective stabilization at a low excipient concentration during freeze-drying. Even a low oligosaccharide-based surfactant content (0.1 mg mL–1) could maintain LDH activity during freeze-drying, but a high surfactant content (1.0 mg mL–1) was required to prevent buffer precipitation and retain high LDH activity on storage. Regarding storage, glass formation restricted molecular mobility in the lyophilized matrix, and LDH activity was effectively retained. The present results describe a strategy based on the glass-forming ability of surfactant-type excipients that affords a natural sugar-free formulation or an alternative use for polysorbate-type surfactants.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)525-532
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Oleo Science
Volume65
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Fingerprint

Oligosaccharides
Citric acid
L-Lactate Dehydrogenase
Surface-Active Agents
Citric Acid
Sugars
Drying
Buffers
Surface active agents
Polysorbates
Excipients
Glass
Thawing
Monosaccharides
Oxidoreductases
Chain length
Stabilization
Proteins

Keywords

  • Citric acid buffer
  • Freeze-drying
  • Glass transition
  • Lactate dehydrogenase
  • Sugar ester

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Chemistry(all)

Cite this

Oligosaccharide-based surfactant/citric acid buffer system stabilizes lactate dehydrogenase during freeze-drying and storage without the addition of natural sugar. / Ogawa, Shigesaburo; Kawai, Ryuichiro; Koga, Maito; Asakura, Kouichi; Takahashi, Isao; Osanai, Shuichi.

In: Journal of Oleo Science, Vol. 65, No. 6, 2016, p. 525-532.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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