Opposing Ventral Striatal Medium Spiny Neuron Activities Shaped by Striatal Parvalbumin-Expressing Interneurons during Goal-Directed Behaviors

Keitaro Yoshida, Iku Tsutsui-Kimura, Anna Kono, Akihiro Yamanaka, Kenta Kobayashi, Masahiko Watanabe, Masaru Mimura, Kenji F. Tanaka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of mice show opposing activities upon the initiation of a food-seeking lever press task. Ventromedial striatal (VMS)-MSNs are inhibited but ventrolateral striatal (VLS)-MSNs are activated; these activities mediate action selection and action initiation, respectively. To understand what input shapes the opposing MSN activities, here, we monitor cortical input activities at the cell population level and artificially reverse them. We demonstrate that the ventral hippocampus (vHP) and the insular cortex (IC) are major inputs to the VMS and VLS, both projections show silencing at the trial start time, and the vHP-VMS and IC-VLS pathways form functionally coupled input-output units during the task. Of note, the upstream IC silencing is converted to the downstream VLS-MSN activation. We find biased localization of striatal parvalbumin-expressing interneurons (PV INs) and verify PV IN-dependent feedforward architecture in the VLS. Our results reveal a distinct mode of cortico-striatal signal conveyance via feedforward disinhibition in behaving animals.

Original languageEnglish
Article number107829
JournalCell Reports
Volume31
Issue number13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020 Jun 30

Keywords

  • corticostriatal
  • feedforward disinhibition
  • fiber photometry
  • goal-directed behavior
  • insular cortex
  • optogenetics
  • pallium
  • ventral hippocampus
  • ventrolateral striatum
  • ventromedial striatum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

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