Optical brain imaging reveals general auditory and language-specific processing in early infant development

Yasuyo Minagawa, Heather Van Der Lely, Franck Ramus, Yutaka Sato, Reiko Mazuka, Emmanuel Dupoux

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

94 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study uses near-infrared spectroscopy in young infants in order to elucidate the nature of functional cerebral processing for speech. Previous imaging studies of infants' speech perception revealed left-lateralized responses to native language. However, it is unclear if these activations were due to language per se rather than to some low-level acoustic correlate of spoken language. Here we compare native (L1) and non-native (L2) languages with 3 different nonspeech conditions including emotional voices, monkey calls, and phase scrambled sounds that provide more stringent controls. Hemodynamic responses to these stimuli were measured in the temporal areas of Japanese 4 month-olds. The results show clear left-lateralized responses to speech, prominently to L1, as opposed to various activation patterns in the nonspeech conditions. Furthermore, implementing a new analysis method designed for infants, we discovered a slower hemodynamic time course in awake infants. Our results are largely explained by signal-driven auditory processing. However, stronger activations to L1 than to L2 indicate a language-specific neural factor that modulates these responses. This study is the first to discover a significantly higher sensitivity to L1 in 4 month-olds and reveals a neural precursor of the functional specialization for the higher cognitive network.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)254-261
Number of pages8
JournalCerebral Cortex
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Feb

Fingerprint

Optical Imaging
Child Development
Neuroimaging
Language
Hemodynamics
Speech Perception
Near-Infrared Spectroscopy
Acoustics
Haplorhini

Keywords

  • emotion
  • infant
  • laterality
  • NIRS
  • speech perception

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Optical brain imaging reveals general auditory and language-specific processing in early infant development. / Minagawa, Yasuyo; Van Der Lely, Heather; Ramus, Franck; Sato, Yutaka; Mazuka, Reiko; Dupoux, Emmanuel.

In: Cerebral Cortex, Vol. 21, No. 2, 02.2011, p. 254-261.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Minagawa, Yasuyo ; Van Der Lely, Heather ; Ramus, Franck ; Sato, Yutaka ; Mazuka, Reiko ; Dupoux, Emmanuel. / Optical brain imaging reveals general auditory and language-specific processing in early infant development. In: Cerebral Cortex. 2011 ; Vol. 21, No. 2. pp. 254-261.
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