Optical CDMA system using embedded transmission method with Manchester signaling

A. Iwata, H. Sawagashira, T. Sonoda, K. Kamakura, I. Sasase

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We propose an optical CDMA system using the embedded transmission (ET) method with Manchester signaling. In the proposed system, transmission bits are embedded in the signature sequence used in optical CDMA systems. Although the Manchester signaling uses two slots for a transmitted bit, the two slots are included in the chip duration of optical CDMA. According to an embedded bit, an optical pulse is transmitted in either slot. In the receiver, the threshold detection for the embedded bits reduces the effect of multiple access interference (MAI) into the erasure state, which is not a transmitted signal. By using codeword of the BCH codes as the transmitted bits, the effect of MAI is removed in the decoding procedure of BCH codes. Since the decoding procedure treats the effect of MAI as the erasure bits, instead of the error bits, using extended BCH(eBCH) codes allows to remove the effect of MAI more efficiently. We analyze the bit error rate (BER) of the system using the ET method with Manchester signaling on the assumption that photodetector outputs obey the Poisson distribution. We show that the system using the ET method with Manchester signaling achieves better BER performance than that without Manchester signaling.

Original languageEnglish
Pages378-381
Number of pages4
Publication statusPublished - 2001 Jan 1
Event2001 IEEE Pacific Rim Conference on Communications, Computers and Signal Processing (PACRIM 2001) - Victoria, BC, Canada
Duration: 2001 Aug 262001 Aug 28

Other

Other2001 IEEE Pacific Rim Conference on Communications, Computers and Signal Processing (PACRIM 2001)
CountryCanada
CityVictoria, BC
Period01/8/2601/8/28

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Signal Processing
  • Computer Networks and Communications

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