Organ preservation solution containing dissolved hydrogen gas from a hydrogen-absorbing alloy canister improves function of transplanted ischemic kidneys in miniature pigs

Eiji Kobayashi, Motoaki Sano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Various methods have been devised to dissolve hydrogen gas in organ preservation solutions, including use of a hydrogen gas cylinder, electrolysis, or a hydrogen-generating agent. However, these methods require considerable time and effort for preparation. We investigated a practical technique for rapidly dissolving hydrogen gas in organ preservation solutions by using a canister containing hydrogen-absorbing alloy. The efficacy of hydrogen-containing organ preservation solution created by this method was tested in a miniature pig model of kidney transplantation from donors with circulatory arrest. The time required for dissolution of hydrogen gas was only 2–3 minutes. When hydrogen gas was infused into a bag containing cold ETK organ preservation solution at a pressure of 0.06 MPa and the bag was subsequently opened to the air, the dissolved hydrogen concentration remained at 1.0 mg/L or more for 4 hours. After warm ischemic injury was induced by circulatory arrest for 30 minutes, donor kidneys were harvested and perfused for 5 minutes with hydrogen-containing cold ETK solution or hydrogen-free cold ETK solution. The perfusion rate was faster from the initial stage with hydrogen-containing cold ETK solution than with hydrogen-free ETK solution. After storage of the kidney in hydrogen-free preservation solution for 1 hour before transplantation, no urine production was observed and blood flow was not detected in the transplanted kidney at sacrifice on postoperative day 6. In contrast, after storage in hydrogen-containing preservation solution for either 1 or 4 hours, urine was detected in the bladder and blood flow was confirmed in the transplanted kidney. This method of dissolving hydrogen gas in organ preservation solution is a practical technique for potentially converting damaged organs to transplantable organs that can be used safely in any clinical setting where organs are removed from donors.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0222863
JournalPloS one
Volume14
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Oct 1

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • General

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Organ preservation solution containing dissolved hydrogen gas from a hydrogen-absorbing alloy canister improves function of transplanted ischemic kidneys in miniature pigs'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this