Organizational justice, psychological distress, and work engagement in Japanese workers

Akiomi Inoue, Norito Kawakami, Masao Ishizaki, Akihito Shimazu, Masao Tsuchiya, Masaji Tabata, Miki Akiyama, Akiko Kitazume, Mitsuyo Kuroda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

59 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose To investigate the cross-sectional association between organizational justice (i.e., procedural justice and interactional justice) and psychological distress or work engagement, as well as the mediating roles of other job stressors (i.e., job demands and job control, or their combination, effort-reward imbalance [ERI], and worksite support). Methods A total of 243 workers (185 males and 58 females) from a manufacturing factory in Japan were surveyed using a self-administered questionnaire including the Organizational Justice Questionnaire, Job Content Questionnaire, Effort-Reward Imbalance Questionnaire, K6 scale, Utrecht Work Engagement Scale, and other covariates. Multiple mediation analyses with the bootstrap technique were conducted. Results In the bivariate analysis, procedural justice and interactional justice were significantly and negatively associated with psychological distress; they were significantly and positively associated with work engagement. In the mediation analysis, reward at work (or ERI) significantly mediated between procedural justice or interactional justice and psychological distress; worksite support significantly mediated between procedural justice or interactional justice and work engagement. Conclusion The effects of organizational justice on psychological distress seem to be mediated by reward at work (or ERI) while those regarding work engagement may be mediated by worksite support to a large extent, at least in Japanese workers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)29-38
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health
Volume83
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Jan
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Effort-reward imbalance model
  • Job demands-control model
  • Organizational justice
  • Psychological distress
  • Work engagement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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