Parental longevity and offspring's home blood pressure: The Ohasama study

Yumiko Watanabe, Hirohito Metoki, Takayoshi Ohkubo, Takuo Hirose, Masahiro Kikuya, Kei Asayama, Ryusuke Inoue, Azusa Hara, Taku Obara, Haruhisa Hoshi, Kazuhito Totsune, Yutaka Imai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Longevity is clustered in particular families. Some studies using conventional blood pressure (BP) reported an association between parental longevity and offspring's BP. No study has used self-measurement of BP at home (home BP). We examined the association between parental longevity and home BP values of adult Japanese offspring. Method: Home and conventional BPs were measured in 1961 residents aged 40 years and over in the general population of Ohasama, Japan. Information about the ages of offspring's parents (age at death or current age) was obtained from a standardized questionnaire. Results: The mean ± SD values of systolic/diastolic home BP in offspring whose mothers died at less than 69 years of age, at 69-84 years of age, and in offspring whose mothers were alive at age 84 years were 127.4 ± 13.2/76.2 ± 9.1, 124.8 ± 15.0/74.4 ± 10.0, and 123.4 ± 15.2/74.4 ± 10.3 mmHg (P = 0.0002/0.009), respectively. Corresponding values in offspring whose fathers died at less than 66 years of age, at 66-80 years of age, and in offspring whose fathers were alive at age 80 years were 125.7 ± 15.2/75.6 ± 10.6, 124.7 ± 14.1/75.0 ± 9.2 and 122.4 ± 14.6/73.6 ± 9.5 mmHg (P = 0.001/0.003), respectively. Multivariate analysis demonstrated associations that were only weakly observed for conventional BP values (conventional BP: P = 0.3/0.4 for maternal and P = 0.3/0.3 for paternal longevity; home BP: P = 0.05/0.2 for maternal and P = 0.0004/0.007 for paternal longevity). Conclusion: Parental premature death was significantly associated with higher home BP levels in adult offspring, suggesting that parental longevity might be a useful additional marker for screening adult offspring at higher risk of hypertension.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)272-277
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of hypertension
Volume28
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Feb 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Blood Pressure
Adult Children
Mothers
Fathers
Parental Death
Hypertension
Premature Mortality
Japan
Multivariate Analysis
Parents
Population

Keywords

  • General population
  • Home blood pressure
  • Hypertension
  • Offspring
  • Parental longevity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Watanabe, Y., Metoki, H., Ohkubo, T., Hirose, T., Kikuya, M., Asayama, K., ... Imai, Y. (2010). Parental longevity and offspring's home blood pressure: The Ohasama study. Journal of hypertension, 28(2), 272-277. https://doi.org/10.1097/HJH.0b013e328332fa78

Parental longevity and offspring's home blood pressure : The Ohasama study. / Watanabe, Yumiko; Metoki, Hirohito; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Hirose, Takuo; Kikuya, Masahiro; Asayama, Kei; Inoue, Ryusuke; Hara, Azusa; Obara, Taku; Hoshi, Haruhisa; Totsune, Kazuhito; Imai, Yutaka.

In: Journal of hypertension, Vol. 28, No. 2, 01.02.2010, p. 272-277.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Watanabe, Y, Metoki, H, Ohkubo, T, Hirose, T, Kikuya, M, Asayama, K, Inoue, R, Hara, A, Obara, T, Hoshi, H, Totsune, K & Imai, Y 2010, 'Parental longevity and offspring's home blood pressure: The Ohasama study', Journal of hypertension, vol. 28, no. 2, pp. 272-277. https://doi.org/10.1097/HJH.0b013e328332fa78
Watanabe Y, Metoki H, Ohkubo T, Hirose T, Kikuya M, Asayama K et al. Parental longevity and offspring's home blood pressure: The Ohasama study. Journal of hypertension. 2010 Feb 1;28(2):272-277. https://doi.org/10.1097/HJH.0b013e328332fa78
Watanabe, Yumiko ; Metoki, Hirohito ; Ohkubo, Takayoshi ; Hirose, Takuo ; Kikuya, Masahiro ; Asayama, Kei ; Inoue, Ryusuke ; Hara, Azusa ; Obara, Taku ; Hoshi, Haruhisa ; Totsune, Kazuhito ; Imai, Yutaka. / Parental longevity and offspring's home blood pressure : The Ohasama study. In: Journal of hypertension. 2010 ; Vol. 28, No. 2. pp. 272-277.
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abstract = "Objective: Longevity is clustered in particular families. Some studies using conventional blood pressure (BP) reported an association between parental longevity and offspring's BP. No study has used self-measurement of BP at home (home BP). We examined the association between parental longevity and home BP values of adult Japanese offspring. Method: Home and conventional BPs were measured in 1961 residents aged 40 years and over in the general population of Ohasama, Japan. Information about the ages of offspring's parents (age at death or current age) was obtained from a standardized questionnaire. Results: The mean ± SD values of systolic/diastolic home BP in offspring whose mothers died at less than 69 years of age, at 69-84 years of age, and in offspring whose mothers were alive at age 84 years were 127.4 ± 13.2/76.2 ± 9.1, 124.8 ± 15.0/74.4 ± 10.0, and 123.4 ± 15.2/74.4 ± 10.3 mmHg (P = 0.0002/0.009), respectively. Corresponding values in offspring whose fathers died at less than 66 years of age, at 66-80 years of age, and in offspring whose fathers were alive at age 80 years were 125.7 ± 15.2/75.6 ± 10.6, 124.7 ± 14.1/75.0 ± 9.2 and 122.4 ± 14.6/73.6 ± 9.5 mmHg (P = 0.001/0.003), respectively. Multivariate analysis demonstrated associations that were only weakly observed for conventional BP values (conventional BP: P = 0.3/0.4 for maternal and P = 0.3/0.3 for paternal longevity; home BP: P = 0.05/0.2 for maternal and P = 0.0004/0.007 for paternal longevity). Conclusion: Parental premature death was significantly associated with higher home BP levels in adult offspring, suggesting that parental longevity might be a useful additional marker for screening adult offspring at higher risk of hypertension.",
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AU - Watanabe, Yumiko

AU - Metoki, Hirohito

AU - Ohkubo, Takayoshi

AU - Hirose, Takuo

AU - Kikuya, Masahiro

AU - Asayama, Kei

AU - Inoue, Ryusuke

AU - Hara, Azusa

AU - Obara, Taku

AU - Hoshi, Haruhisa

AU - Totsune, Kazuhito

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KW - General population

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KW - Hypertension

KW - Offspring

KW - Parental longevity

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