Pattern classification in Kampo medicine

S. Yakubo, M. Ito, Y. Ueda, H. Okamoto, Y. Kimura, Y. Amano, T. Togo, H. Adachi, T. Mitsuma, Kenji Watanabe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pattern classification is very unique in traditional medicine. Kampo medical patterns have transformed over time during Japan's history. In the 17th to 18th centuries, Japanese doctors advocated elimination of the Ming medical theory and followed the basic concepts put forth by Shang Han Lun and Jin Gui Yao Lue in the later Han dynasty (25-220 AD). The physician Todo Yoshimasu (1702-1773) emphasized that an appropriate treatment could be administered if a set of patterns could be identified. This principle is still referred to as "matching of pattern and formula" and is the basic concept underlying Kampo medicine today. In 1868, the Meiji restoration occurred, and the new government changed its policies to follow that of the European countries, adopting only Western medicine. Physicians trained in Western medicine played an important role in the revival of Kampo medicine, modernizing Kampo patterns to avoid confusion with Western biomedical terminology. In order to understand the Japanese version of traditional disorders and patterns, background information on the history of Kampo and its role in the current health care system in Japan is important. In this paper we overviewed the formation of Kampo patterns.

Original languageEnglish
Article number535146
JournalEvidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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Kampo Medicine
Japan
History
Medicine
Physicians
Traditional Medicine
Terminology
Delivery of Health Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Complementary and alternative medicine

Cite this

Yakubo, S., Ito, M., Ueda, Y., Okamoto, H., Kimura, Y., Amano, Y., ... Watanabe, K. (2014). Pattern classification in Kampo medicine. Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 2014, [535146]. https://doi.org/10.1155/2014/535146

Pattern classification in Kampo medicine. / Yakubo, S.; Ito, M.; Ueda, Y.; Okamoto, H.; Kimura, Y.; Amano, Y.; Togo, T.; Adachi, H.; Mitsuma, T.; Watanabe, Kenji.

In: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Vol. 2014, 535146, 2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yakubo, S, Ito, M, Ueda, Y, Okamoto, H, Kimura, Y, Amano, Y, Togo, T, Adachi, H, Mitsuma, T & Watanabe, K 2014, 'Pattern classification in Kampo medicine', Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, vol. 2014, 535146. https://doi.org/10.1155/2014/535146
Yakubo, S. ; Ito, M. ; Ueda, Y. ; Okamoto, H. ; Kimura, Y. ; Amano, Y. ; Togo, T. ; Adachi, H. ; Mitsuma, T. ; Watanabe, Kenji. / Pattern classification in Kampo medicine. In: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine. 2014 ; Vol. 2014.
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