Peak aerobic performance and left ventricular morphological characteristics in university students

Hajime Yamazaki, Shohei Onishi, Fuminori Katsukawa, Hiroyuki Ishida, Norimitsu Kinoshita

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To determine whether a relationship exists between left ventricular morphology and aerobic capacity in large numbers of male university students with a physically inactive and active life style. Design: A prospective study. Setting: Sports medicine research center. Participants: Eleven sedentary normal-weight university students, 17 sedentary overweight university students, and 215 university athletes. Main Outcome Measures: After the echocardiographic examination, an incremental treadmill exercise test until exhaustion was performed to measure peak oxygen uptake (VO2). Results: In sedentary students, absolute peak VO2 in the overweight students was slightly higher than that in normal-weight students (3,024 vs. 2,912 ml/min). Relative peak VO2 (ml/min/kg) was highly negatively correlated with body mass index (kg/m2) in a total of 28 sedentary students. The correlation between absolute peak VO2 and left ventricular dimension was weak in the sedentary overweight students; however, a correlation coefficient of 0.55 was obtained in athletic students. A stepwise multiple regression showed significant determinants of absolute peak VO2 in athletic students for body surface area (45%), left ventricular dimension (7%), and certain sports (6%). Conclusions: A physically active life style plays a role in increasing both aerobic capacity and left ventricular enlargement. Body size appeared to be a potent stimulus to left ventricular enlargement.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)286-290
Number of pages5
JournalClinical Journal of Sport Medicine
Volume10
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2000 Oct

Fingerprint

Students
Sports
Exercise Test
Life Style
Weights and Measures
Sports Medicine
Body Surface Area
Body Size
Athletes
Body Mass Index
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Prospective Studies
Oxygen
Research

Keywords

  • Echocardiography
  • Left ventricle
  • Obesity
  • Peak oxygen uptake

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Peak aerobic performance and left ventricular morphological characteristics in university students. / Yamazaki, Hajime; Onishi, Shohei; Katsukawa, Fuminori; Ishida, Hiroyuki; Kinoshita, Norimitsu.

In: Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine, Vol. 10, No. 4, 10.2000, p. 286-290.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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