Pharmacological strategies to counteract antipsychotic-induced weight gain and metabolic adverse effects in schizophrenia

A systematic review and meta-analysis

Yuya Mizuno, Takefumi Suzuki, Atsuo Nakagawa, Kazunari Yoshida, Masaru Mimura, Walter Wolfgang Fleischhacker, Hiroyuki Uchida

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

84 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Antipsychotic-induced metabolic adversities are often difficult to manage. Using concomitant medications to counteract these adversities may be a rational option. Objective: To systematically determine the effectiveness of medications to counteract antipsychotic-induced metabolic adversities in patients with schizophrenia. Data Sources: Published articles until November 2013 were searched using 5 electronic databases. Clinical trial registries were searched for unpublished trials. Study Selection: Double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trials focusing on patients with schizophrenia were included if they evaluated the effects of concomitant medications on antipsychotic-induced metabolic adversities as a primary outcome. Data Extraction: Variables relating to participants, interventions, comparisons, outcomes, and study design were extracted. The primary outcome was change in body weight. Secondary outcomes included clinically relevant weight change, fasting glucose, hemoglobin A1c, fasting insulin, insulin resistance, cholesterol, and triglycerides. Data Synthesis: Forty trials representing 19 unique interventions were included in this meta-analysis. Metformin was the most extensively studied drug in regard to body weight, the mean difference amounting to -3.17 kg (95% CI: -4.44 to -1.90 kg) compared to placebo. Pooled effects for topiramate, sibutramine, aripiprazole, and reboxetine were also different from placebo. Furthermore, metformin and rosiglitazone improved insulin resistance, while aripiprazole, metformin, and sibutramine decreased blood lipids. Conclusion: When nonpharmacological strategies alone are insufficient, and switching antipsychotics to relatively weight-neutral agents is not feasible, the literature supports the use of concomitant metformin as first choice among pharmacological interventions to counteract antipsychotic-induced weight gain and other metabolic adversities in schizophrenia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1385-1403
Number of pages19
JournalSchizophrenia Bulletin
Volume40
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Nov 1

Fingerprint

sibutramine
Antipsychotic Agents
Metformin
Weight Gain
Meta-Analysis
Schizophrenia
Pharmacology
rosiglitazone
Placebos
Insulin Resistance
Fasting
Weights and Measures
Body Weight Changes
Information Storage and Retrieval
Double-Blind Method
Registries
Hemoglobins
Triglycerides
Randomized Controlled Trials
Cholesterol

Keywords

  • antipsychotic
  • concomitant
  • meta-analysis
  • metabolic
  • PRISMA
  • schizophrenia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Pharmacological strategies to counteract antipsychotic-induced weight gain and metabolic adverse effects in schizophrenia : A systematic review and meta-analysis. / Mizuno, Yuya; Suzuki, Takefumi; Nakagawa, Atsuo; Yoshida, Kazunari; Mimura, Masaru; Fleischhacker, Walter Wolfgang; Uchida, Hiroyuki.

In: Schizophrenia Bulletin, Vol. 40, No. 6, 01.11.2014, p. 1385-1403.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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