Phylogenetic relationships and biogeography of the Japanese clawed salamander, Onychodactylus japonicus (Amphibia

Caudata: Hynobiidae), and its congener inferred from the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene

Natsuhiko Yoshikawa, Masafumi Matsui, Kanto Nishikawa, Jong Bum Kim, Alexei Kryukov

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene, we investigated phylogenetic relationships between and within the Japanese clawed salamander, Onychodactylus japonicus, and its close continental relative O. fischeri. Monophyly of O. japonicus was well supported, and O. japonicus was clearly distinguished from O. fischeri. However, O. fischeri comprises genetically distinct populations from Russia, NE China, and Korea that do not form a monophyletic group. Within O. japonicus, four major clades were clearly recognized: Clade I from northern Tohoku district, Clade II from southern Tohoku district and the Tsukuba Mountains, Clade III from southwestern Honshu, and Clade IV from Kinki and Chugoku districts in Honshu and from Shikoku. Although genetic distances among these clades were large (5.5-9.6%), relationships among the clades were unresolved. All clades except Clade I contained two or three distinct subclades. In several localities in Kinki and Chugoku, Clades III and IV were sympatric. The estimated divergence times and available geohistorical data suggest that O. japonicus began to differentiate in the Upper Late Miocene and that the pattern of genetic differentiation of this species has been affected strongly by climate changes and geohistorical events such as volcanic activity and mountain formation. Our results suggest that both O. fischeri and O. japonicus comprise multiple cryptic species.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)249-259
Number of pages11
JournalMolecular Phylogenetics and Evolution
Volume49
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Oct 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Phylogeography
Urodela
Cytochromes b
Caudata
Climate Change
Russia
Amphibia
Amphibians
Korea
salamanders and newts
cytochrome b
biogeography
cytochrome
China
Japan
phylogenetics
mountain
gene
phylogeny
mountains

Keywords

  • Biogeography
  • Cytochrome b
  • mtDNA
  • Onychodactylus fischeri
  • Onychodactylus japonicus
  • Paraphyly

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

Cite this

@article{5de945c473c7436c8a6f9554456c2006,
title = "Phylogenetic relationships and biogeography of the Japanese clawed salamander, Onychodactylus japonicus (Amphibia: Caudata: Hynobiidae), and its congener inferred from the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene",
abstract = "Using the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene, we investigated phylogenetic relationships between and within the Japanese clawed salamander, Onychodactylus japonicus, and its close continental relative O. fischeri. Monophyly of O. japonicus was well supported, and O. japonicus was clearly distinguished from O. fischeri. However, O. fischeri comprises genetically distinct populations from Russia, NE China, and Korea that do not form a monophyletic group. Within O. japonicus, four major clades were clearly recognized: Clade I from northern Tohoku district, Clade II from southern Tohoku district and the Tsukuba Mountains, Clade III from southwestern Honshu, and Clade IV from Kinki and Chugoku districts in Honshu and from Shikoku. Although genetic distances among these clades were large (5.5-9.6{\%}), relationships among the clades were unresolved. All clades except Clade I contained two or three distinct subclades. In several localities in Kinki and Chugoku, Clades III and IV were sympatric. The estimated divergence times and available geohistorical data suggest that O. japonicus began to differentiate in the Upper Late Miocene and that the pattern of genetic differentiation of this species has been affected strongly by climate changes and geohistorical events such as volcanic activity and mountain formation. Our results suggest that both O. fischeri and O. japonicus comprise multiple cryptic species.",
keywords = "Biogeography, Cytochrome b, mtDNA, Onychodactylus fischeri, Onychodactylus japonicus, Paraphyly",
author = "Natsuhiko Yoshikawa and Masafumi Matsui and Kanto Nishikawa and Kim, {Jong Bum} and Alexei Kryukov",
year = "2008",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.ympev.2008.07.016",
language = "English",
volume = "49",
pages = "249--259",
journal = "Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution",
issn = "1055-7903",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Phylogenetic relationships and biogeography of the Japanese clawed salamander, Onychodactylus japonicus (Amphibia

T2 - Caudata: Hynobiidae), and its congener inferred from the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene

AU - Yoshikawa, Natsuhiko

AU - Matsui, Masafumi

AU - Nishikawa, Kanto

AU - Kim, Jong Bum

AU - Kryukov, Alexei

PY - 2008/10/1

Y1 - 2008/10/1

N2 - Using the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene, we investigated phylogenetic relationships between and within the Japanese clawed salamander, Onychodactylus japonicus, and its close continental relative O. fischeri. Monophyly of O. japonicus was well supported, and O. japonicus was clearly distinguished from O. fischeri. However, O. fischeri comprises genetically distinct populations from Russia, NE China, and Korea that do not form a monophyletic group. Within O. japonicus, four major clades were clearly recognized: Clade I from northern Tohoku district, Clade II from southern Tohoku district and the Tsukuba Mountains, Clade III from southwestern Honshu, and Clade IV from Kinki and Chugoku districts in Honshu and from Shikoku. Although genetic distances among these clades were large (5.5-9.6%), relationships among the clades were unresolved. All clades except Clade I contained two or three distinct subclades. In several localities in Kinki and Chugoku, Clades III and IV were sympatric. The estimated divergence times and available geohistorical data suggest that O. japonicus began to differentiate in the Upper Late Miocene and that the pattern of genetic differentiation of this species has been affected strongly by climate changes and geohistorical events such as volcanic activity and mountain formation. Our results suggest that both O. fischeri and O. japonicus comprise multiple cryptic species.

AB - Using the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene, we investigated phylogenetic relationships between and within the Japanese clawed salamander, Onychodactylus japonicus, and its close continental relative O. fischeri. Monophyly of O. japonicus was well supported, and O. japonicus was clearly distinguished from O. fischeri. However, O. fischeri comprises genetically distinct populations from Russia, NE China, and Korea that do not form a monophyletic group. Within O. japonicus, four major clades were clearly recognized: Clade I from northern Tohoku district, Clade II from southern Tohoku district and the Tsukuba Mountains, Clade III from southwestern Honshu, and Clade IV from Kinki and Chugoku districts in Honshu and from Shikoku. Although genetic distances among these clades were large (5.5-9.6%), relationships among the clades were unresolved. All clades except Clade I contained two or three distinct subclades. In several localities in Kinki and Chugoku, Clades III and IV were sympatric. The estimated divergence times and available geohistorical data suggest that O. japonicus began to differentiate in the Upper Late Miocene and that the pattern of genetic differentiation of this species has been affected strongly by climate changes and geohistorical events such as volcanic activity and mountain formation. Our results suggest that both O. fischeri and O. japonicus comprise multiple cryptic species.

KW - Biogeography

KW - Cytochrome b

KW - mtDNA

KW - Onychodactylus fischeri

KW - Onychodactylus japonicus

KW - Paraphyly

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=52049110036&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=52049110036&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ympev.2008.07.016

DO - 10.1016/j.ympev.2008.07.016

M3 - Article

VL - 49

SP - 249

EP - 259

JO - Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution

JF - Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution

SN - 1055-7903

IS - 1

ER -