Physical Activity

I. Min Lee, Yuko Oguma

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This chapter discusses epidemiologic studies of physical activity and cancer prevention. There is a large body of epidemiologic data on the relation between physical activity and the risk of developing cancer. Although the direct evidence on this relation comes only from observational studies, randomized clinical trials have provided indirect evidence by examining the association of physical activity with markers of cancer risk, such as body weight and hormone levels. Moreover, several plausible biological mechanisms support the hypothesis that higher levels of physical activity decrease the incidence of various cancers. The data are clearest for colon and breast cancer, with case-control and cohort studies supporting a moderate, inverse relation between physical activity and the development of these cancers.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCancer Epidemiology and Prevention
PublisherOxford University Press
ISBN (Print)9780199865062, 0195149610, 9780195149616
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Sep 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Neoplasms
Colonic Neoplasms
Observational Studies
Case-Control Studies
Epidemiologic Studies
Cohort Studies
Randomized Controlled Trials
Body Weight
Hormones
Breast Neoplasms
Incidence

Keywords

  • Biological mechanisms
  • Breast cancer
  • Cancer prevention
  • Cancer risk
  • Colon cancer
  • Exercise

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Lee, I. M., & Oguma, Y. (2009). Physical Activity. In Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195149616.003.0023

Physical Activity. / Lee, I. Min; Oguma, Yuko.

Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention. Oxford University Press, 2009.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Lee, IM & Oguma, Y 2009, Physical Activity. in Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention. Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195149616.003.0023
Lee IM, Oguma Y. Physical Activity. In Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention. Oxford University Press. 2009 https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195149616.003.0023
Lee, I. Min ; Oguma, Yuko. / Physical Activity. Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention. Oxford University Press, 2009.
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