Plasma fibrinogen, ambulatory blood pressure, and silent cerebrovascular lesions

The Ohasama study

Yoko Aono, Takayoshi Ohkubo, Masahiro Kikuya, Azusa Hara, Takeo Kondo, Taku Obara, Hirohito Metoki, Ryusuke Inoue, Kei Asayama, Yoriko Shintani, Junichiro Hashimoto, Kazuhito Totsune, Haruhisa Hoshi, Hiroshi Satoh, Shin Ichi Izumi, Yutaka Imai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE - Twenty-four-hour ambulatory blood pressure (24-hour ABP) values are considered a powerful predictor of stroke. Silent cerebrovascular lesions are associated with an increased risk of stroke. Because fibrinogen is a major determinant of plasma viscosity, an elevated fibrinogen level might also be associated with stroke risk. We evaluated the association of 24-hour ABP and plasma fibrinogen levels with the risk of silent cerebrovascular lesions (white matter hyperintensity and lacunar infarct) detected by MRI. METHODS AND RESULTS - The study cohort comprised 958 individuals from the general population of Ohasama, a rural Japanese community. Multiple logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, smoking and drinking status, use of antihypertensive medication, body mass index, 24-hour ABP, and a history of hypercholesterolemia, diabetes mellitus, and atrial fibrillation demonstrated that each 1-SD increase in fibrinogen level was associated with a significantly increased risk of silent cerebrovascular lesions (odds ratio, 1.26; P=0.001). The 24-hour ABP was also significantly and independently associated with the risk of silent cerebrovascular lesions. Even when 24-hour ABP values were within normal range (<135/80 mm Hg), elevated fibrinogen levels were associated with an increased risk of silent cerebrovascular lesions. Fibrinogen and 24-hour BP had additive effects on silent cerebrovascular lesions. CONCLUSION - The 24-hour ABP and plasma fibrinogen levels were closely and independently associated with the risk of silent cerebrovascular lesions including white matter hyperintensity and lacunar infarct.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)963-968
Number of pages6
JournalArteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Apr 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Fibrinogen
Blood Pressure
Lacunar Stroke
Stroke
Rural Population
Hypercholesterolemia
Viscosity
Atrial Fibrillation
Antihypertensive Agents
Drinking
Diabetes Mellitus
Reference Values
Body Mass Index
Cohort Studies
Logistic Models
Smoking
Odds Ratio
Regression Analysis
Population

Keywords

  • Ambulatory blood pressure
  • Lacunar infarct
  • Plasma fibrinogen
  • Silent cerebrovascular lesions
  • White matter hyperintensity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Plasma fibrinogen, ambulatory blood pressure, and silent cerebrovascular lesions : The Ohasama study. / Aono, Yoko; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Kikuya, Masahiro; Hara, Azusa; Kondo, Takeo; Obara, Taku; Metoki, Hirohito; Inoue, Ryusuke; Asayama, Kei; Shintani, Yoriko; Hashimoto, Junichiro; Totsune, Kazuhito; Hoshi, Haruhisa; Satoh, Hiroshi; Izumi, Shin Ichi; Imai, Yutaka.

In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology, Vol. 27, No. 4, 01.04.2007, p. 963-968.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Aono, Y, Ohkubo, T, Kikuya, M, Hara, A, Kondo, T, Obara, T, Metoki, H, Inoue, R, Asayama, K, Shintani, Y, Hashimoto, J, Totsune, K, Hoshi, H, Satoh, H, Izumi, SI & Imai, Y 2007, 'Plasma fibrinogen, ambulatory blood pressure, and silent cerebrovascular lesions: The Ohasama study', Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology, vol. 27, no. 4, pp. 963-968. https://doi.org/10.1161/01.ATV.0000258947.17570.38
Aono, Yoko ; Ohkubo, Takayoshi ; Kikuya, Masahiro ; Hara, Azusa ; Kondo, Takeo ; Obara, Taku ; Metoki, Hirohito ; Inoue, Ryusuke ; Asayama, Kei ; Shintani, Yoriko ; Hashimoto, Junichiro ; Totsune, Kazuhito ; Hoshi, Haruhisa ; Satoh, Hiroshi ; Izumi, Shin Ichi ; Imai, Yutaka. / Plasma fibrinogen, ambulatory blood pressure, and silent cerebrovascular lesions : The Ohasama study. In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology. 2007 ; Vol. 27, No. 4. pp. 963-968.
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T1 - Plasma fibrinogen, ambulatory blood pressure, and silent cerebrovascular lesions

T2 - The Ohasama study

AU - Aono, Yoko

AU - Ohkubo, Takayoshi

AU - Kikuya, Masahiro

AU - Hara, Azusa

AU - Kondo, Takeo

AU - Obara, Taku

AU - Metoki, Hirohito

AU - Inoue, Ryusuke

AU - Asayama, Kei

AU - Shintani, Yoriko

AU - Hashimoto, Junichiro

AU - Totsune, Kazuhito

AU - Hoshi, Haruhisa

AU - Satoh, Hiroshi

AU - Izumi, Shin Ichi

AU - Imai, Yutaka

PY - 2007/4/1

Y1 - 2007/4/1

N2 - OBJECTIVE - Twenty-four-hour ambulatory blood pressure (24-hour ABP) values are considered a powerful predictor of stroke. Silent cerebrovascular lesions are associated with an increased risk of stroke. Because fibrinogen is a major determinant of plasma viscosity, an elevated fibrinogen level might also be associated with stroke risk. We evaluated the association of 24-hour ABP and plasma fibrinogen levels with the risk of silent cerebrovascular lesions (white matter hyperintensity and lacunar infarct) detected by MRI. METHODS AND RESULTS - The study cohort comprised 958 individuals from the general population of Ohasama, a rural Japanese community. Multiple logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, smoking and drinking status, use of antihypertensive medication, body mass index, 24-hour ABP, and a history of hypercholesterolemia, diabetes mellitus, and atrial fibrillation demonstrated that each 1-SD increase in fibrinogen level was associated with a significantly increased risk of silent cerebrovascular lesions (odds ratio, 1.26; P=0.001). The 24-hour ABP was also significantly and independently associated with the risk of silent cerebrovascular lesions. Even when 24-hour ABP values were within normal range (<135/80 mm Hg), elevated fibrinogen levels were associated with an increased risk of silent cerebrovascular lesions. Fibrinogen and 24-hour BP had additive effects on silent cerebrovascular lesions. CONCLUSION - The 24-hour ABP and plasma fibrinogen levels were closely and independently associated with the risk of silent cerebrovascular lesions including white matter hyperintensity and lacunar infarct.

AB - OBJECTIVE - Twenty-four-hour ambulatory blood pressure (24-hour ABP) values are considered a powerful predictor of stroke. Silent cerebrovascular lesions are associated with an increased risk of stroke. Because fibrinogen is a major determinant of plasma viscosity, an elevated fibrinogen level might also be associated with stroke risk. We evaluated the association of 24-hour ABP and plasma fibrinogen levels with the risk of silent cerebrovascular lesions (white matter hyperintensity and lacunar infarct) detected by MRI. METHODS AND RESULTS - The study cohort comprised 958 individuals from the general population of Ohasama, a rural Japanese community. Multiple logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, smoking and drinking status, use of antihypertensive medication, body mass index, 24-hour ABP, and a history of hypercholesterolemia, diabetes mellitus, and atrial fibrillation demonstrated that each 1-SD increase in fibrinogen level was associated with a significantly increased risk of silent cerebrovascular lesions (odds ratio, 1.26; P=0.001). The 24-hour ABP was also significantly and independently associated with the risk of silent cerebrovascular lesions. Even when 24-hour ABP values were within normal range (<135/80 mm Hg), elevated fibrinogen levels were associated with an increased risk of silent cerebrovascular lesions. Fibrinogen and 24-hour BP had additive effects on silent cerebrovascular lesions. CONCLUSION - The 24-hour ABP and plasma fibrinogen levels were closely and independently associated with the risk of silent cerebrovascular lesions including white matter hyperintensity and lacunar infarct.

KW - Ambulatory blood pressure

KW - Lacunar infarct

KW - Plasma fibrinogen

KW - Silent cerebrovascular lesions

KW - White matter hyperintensity

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