Polyurethane surface modification by graft polymerization of acrylamide for reduced protein adsorption and platelet adhesion

Keiji Fujimoto, Hideki Tadokoro, Yohichi Ueda, Yoshito Ikada

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

91 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Surface modification of polyurethane by glow-discharge treatment and subsequent graft polymerization of acrylamide was studied. The modified hydrophilic surfaces were characterized by the measurements of dynamic contact angle and ζ potentials and examined for protein adsorption behaviour and platelet adhesion. Data from in vitro and ex vivo experiments indicated a reduction of protein adsorption and platelet adhesion for the hydrophillic graft polymers, the extent of which was correlated to polymer graft density.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)442-448
Number of pages7
JournalBiomaterials
Volume14
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Polyurethanes
Acrylamide
Graft copolymers
Platelets
Grafts
Polymerization
Adsorption
Surface treatment
Blood Platelets
Adhesion
Proteins
Transplants
Polymers
Glow discharges
Contact angle
Experiments

Keywords

  • graft polymerization
  • platelet adhesion
  • protein adsorption
  • Surface modification

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Bioengineering
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Polyurethane surface modification by graft polymerization of acrylamide for reduced protein adsorption and platelet adhesion. / Fujimoto, Keiji; Tadokoro, Hideki; Ueda, Yohichi; Ikada, Yoshito.

In: Biomaterials, Vol. 14, No. 6, 1993, p. 442-448.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{089bba0f019a419daca3624cf09c8178,
title = "Polyurethane surface modification by graft polymerization of acrylamide for reduced protein adsorption and platelet adhesion",
abstract = "Surface modification of polyurethane by glow-discharge treatment and subsequent graft polymerization of acrylamide was studied. The modified hydrophilic surfaces were characterized by the measurements of dynamic contact angle and ζ potentials and examined for protein adsorption behaviour and platelet adhesion. Data from in vitro and ex vivo experiments indicated a reduction of protein adsorption and platelet adhesion for the hydrophillic graft polymers, the extent of which was correlated to polymer graft density.",
keywords = "graft polymerization, platelet adhesion, protein adsorption, Surface modification",
author = "Keiji Fujimoto and Hideki Tadokoro and Yohichi Ueda and Yoshito Ikada",
year = "1993",
doi = "10.1016/0142-9612(93)90147-T",
language = "English",
volume = "14",
pages = "442--448",
journal = "Biomaterials",
issn = "0142-9612",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Polyurethane surface modification by graft polymerization of acrylamide for reduced protein adsorption and platelet adhesion

AU - Fujimoto, Keiji

AU - Tadokoro, Hideki

AU - Ueda, Yohichi

AU - Ikada, Yoshito

PY - 1993

Y1 - 1993

N2 - Surface modification of polyurethane by glow-discharge treatment and subsequent graft polymerization of acrylamide was studied. The modified hydrophilic surfaces were characterized by the measurements of dynamic contact angle and ζ potentials and examined for protein adsorption behaviour and platelet adhesion. Data from in vitro and ex vivo experiments indicated a reduction of protein adsorption and platelet adhesion for the hydrophillic graft polymers, the extent of which was correlated to polymer graft density.

AB - Surface modification of polyurethane by glow-discharge treatment and subsequent graft polymerization of acrylamide was studied. The modified hydrophilic surfaces were characterized by the measurements of dynamic contact angle and ζ potentials and examined for protein adsorption behaviour and platelet adhesion. Data from in vitro and ex vivo experiments indicated a reduction of protein adsorption and platelet adhesion for the hydrophillic graft polymers, the extent of which was correlated to polymer graft density.

KW - graft polymerization

KW - platelet adhesion

KW - protein adsorption

KW - Surface modification

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0027593515&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0027593515&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0142-9612(93)90147-T

DO - 10.1016/0142-9612(93)90147-T

M3 - Article

VL - 14

SP - 442

EP - 448

JO - Biomaterials

JF - Biomaterials

SN - 0142-9612

IS - 6

ER -