Pomegranate juice inhibits sulfoconjugation in caco-2 human colon carcinoma cells

Ayako Saruwatari, Shigeaki Okamura, Yoko Nakajima, Yuuji Narukawa, Tadahiro Takeda, Hiroomi Tamura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Several fruit juices have been reported to cause food-drug interactions, mainly affecting cytochrome P450 activity; however, little is known about the effects of fruit juices on conjugation reactions. Among several fruit juices tested (apple, peach, orange, pineapple, grapefruit, and pomegranate), pomegranate juice potently inhibited the sulfoconjugation of 1-naphthol in Caco-2 cells. This inhibition was both dose- and culture time-dependent, with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) value calculated at 2.7% (vol/vol). In contrast, no obvious inhibition of glucuronidation of 1-naphthol in Caco-2 cells was observed by any of the juices examined. Punicalagin, the most abundant antioxidant polyphenol in pomegranate juice, was also found to strongly inhibit sulfoconjugation in Caco-2 cells with an IC50 of 45 μM, which is consistent with that of pomegranate juice. These data suggest that punicalagin is mainly responsible for the inhibition of sulfoconjugation by pomegranate juice. We additionally demonstrated that pomegranate juice and punicalagin both inhibit phenol sulfotransferase activity in Caco-2 cells in vitro, at concentrations that are almost equivalent to those used in the Caco-2 cells. Pomegranate juice, however, shows no effects on the expression of the sulfotransferase SULT1A family of genes (SULT1A1 and SULT1A3) in Caco-2 cells. These results indicate that the inhibition of sulfotransferase activity by punicalagin in Caco-2 cells is responsible for the reductions seen in 1-naphthyl sulfate accumulation. Our data also suggest that constituents of pomegranate juice, most probably punicalagin, impair the enteric functions of sulfoconjugation and that this might have effects upon the bioavailability of drugs and other compounds present in food and in the environment. These effects might be related to the anticarcinogenic properties of pomegranate juice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)623-628
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Medicinal Food
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Dec 1

Fingerprint

Punicaceae
Caco-2 Cells
Colon
Carcinoma
Inhibitory Concentration 50
Sulfotransferases
Arylsulfotransferase
Food-Drug Interactions
Ananas
Citrus paradisi
Malus
Polyphenols
Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System
Biological Availability
Antioxidants
punicalagin
Food

Keywords

  • Caco-2
  • Pomegranate
  • Sulfoconjugation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Pomegranate juice inhibits sulfoconjugation in caco-2 human colon carcinoma cells. / Saruwatari, Ayako; Okamura, Shigeaki; Nakajima, Yoko; Narukawa, Yuuji; Takeda, Tadahiro; Tamura, Hiroomi.

In: Journal of Medicinal Food, Vol. 11, No. 4, 01.12.2008, p. 623-628.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Saruwatari, Ayako ; Okamura, Shigeaki ; Nakajima, Yoko ; Narukawa, Yuuji ; Takeda, Tadahiro ; Tamura, Hiroomi. / Pomegranate juice inhibits sulfoconjugation in caco-2 human colon carcinoma cells. In: Journal of Medicinal Food. 2008 ; Vol. 11, No. 4. pp. 623-628.
@article{76dc4a7792e84d98ba149e0fd2bacf19,
title = "Pomegranate juice inhibits sulfoconjugation in caco-2 human colon carcinoma cells",
abstract = "Several fruit juices have been reported to cause food-drug interactions, mainly affecting cytochrome P450 activity; however, little is known about the effects of fruit juices on conjugation reactions. Among several fruit juices tested (apple, peach, orange, pineapple, grapefruit, and pomegranate), pomegranate juice potently inhibited the sulfoconjugation of 1-naphthol in Caco-2 cells. This inhibition was both dose- and culture time-dependent, with a 50{\%} inhibitory concentration (IC50) value calculated at 2.7{\%} (vol/vol). In contrast, no obvious inhibition of glucuronidation of 1-naphthol in Caco-2 cells was observed by any of the juices examined. Punicalagin, the most abundant antioxidant polyphenol in pomegranate juice, was also found to strongly inhibit sulfoconjugation in Caco-2 cells with an IC50 of 45 μM, which is consistent with that of pomegranate juice. These data suggest that punicalagin is mainly responsible for the inhibition of sulfoconjugation by pomegranate juice. We additionally demonstrated that pomegranate juice and punicalagin both inhibit phenol sulfotransferase activity in Caco-2 cells in vitro, at concentrations that are almost equivalent to those used in the Caco-2 cells. Pomegranate juice, however, shows no effects on the expression of the sulfotransferase SULT1A family of genes (SULT1A1 and SULT1A3) in Caco-2 cells. These results indicate that the inhibition of sulfotransferase activity by punicalagin in Caco-2 cells is responsible for the reductions seen in 1-naphthyl sulfate accumulation. Our data also suggest that constituents of pomegranate juice, most probably punicalagin, impair the enteric functions of sulfoconjugation and that this might have effects upon the bioavailability of drugs and other compounds present in food and in the environment. These effects might be related to the anticarcinogenic properties of pomegranate juice.",
keywords = "Caco-2, Pomegranate, Sulfoconjugation",
author = "Ayako Saruwatari and Shigeaki Okamura and Yoko Nakajima and Yuuji Narukawa and Tadahiro Takeda and Hiroomi Tamura",
year = "2008",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1089/jmf.2007.0050",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
pages = "623--628",
journal = "Journal of Medicinal Food",
issn = "1096-620X",
publisher = "Mary Ann Liebert Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Pomegranate juice inhibits sulfoconjugation in caco-2 human colon carcinoma cells

AU - Saruwatari, Ayako

AU - Okamura, Shigeaki

AU - Nakajima, Yoko

AU - Narukawa, Yuuji

AU - Takeda, Tadahiro

AU - Tamura, Hiroomi

PY - 2008/12/1

Y1 - 2008/12/1

N2 - Several fruit juices have been reported to cause food-drug interactions, mainly affecting cytochrome P450 activity; however, little is known about the effects of fruit juices on conjugation reactions. Among several fruit juices tested (apple, peach, orange, pineapple, grapefruit, and pomegranate), pomegranate juice potently inhibited the sulfoconjugation of 1-naphthol in Caco-2 cells. This inhibition was both dose- and culture time-dependent, with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) value calculated at 2.7% (vol/vol). In contrast, no obvious inhibition of glucuronidation of 1-naphthol in Caco-2 cells was observed by any of the juices examined. Punicalagin, the most abundant antioxidant polyphenol in pomegranate juice, was also found to strongly inhibit sulfoconjugation in Caco-2 cells with an IC50 of 45 μM, which is consistent with that of pomegranate juice. These data suggest that punicalagin is mainly responsible for the inhibition of sulfoconjugation by pomegranate juice. We additionally demonstrated that pomegranate juice and punicalagin both inhibit phenol sulfotransferase activity in Caco-2 cells in vitro, at concentrations that are almost equivalent to those used in the Caco-2 cells. Pomegranate juice, however, shows no effects on the expression of the sulfotransferase SULT1A family of genes (SULT1A1 and SULT1A3) in Caco-2 cells. These results indicate that the inhibition of sulfotransferase activity by punicalagin in Caco-2 cells is responsible for the reductions seen in 1-naphthyl sulfate accumulation. Our data also suggest that constituents of pomegranate juice, most probably punicalagin, impair the enteric functions of sulfoconjugation and that this might have effects upon the bioavailability of drugs and other compounds present in food and in the environment. These effects might be related to the anticarcinogenic properties of pomegranate juice.

AB - Several fruit juices have been reported to cause food-drug interactions, mainly affecting cytochrome P450 activity; however, little is known about the effects of fruit juices on conjugation reactions. Among several fruit juices tested (apple, peach, orange, pineapple, grapefruit, and pomegranate), pomegranate juice potently inhibited the sulfoconjugation of 1-naphthol in Caco-2 cells. This inhibition was both dose- and culture time-dependent, with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) value calculated at 2.7% (vol/vol). In contrast, no obvious inhibition of glucuronidation of 1-naphthol in Caco-2 cells was observed by any of the juices examined. Punicalagin, the most abundant antioxidant polyphenol in pomegranate juice, was also found to strongly inhibit sulfoconjugation in Caco-2 cells with an IC50 of 45 μM, which is consistent with that of pomegranate juice. These data suggest that punicalagin is mainly responsible for the inhibition of sulfoconjugation by pomegranate juice. We additionally demonstrated that pomegranate juice and punicalagin both inhibit phenol sulfotransferase activity in Caco-2 cells in vitro, at concentrations that are almost equivalent to those used in the Caco-2 cells. Pomegranate juice, however, shows no effects on the expression of the sulfotransferase SULT1A family of genes (SULT1A1 and SULT1A3) in Caco-2 cells. These results indicate that the inhibition of sulfotransferase activity by punicalagin in Caco-2 cells is responsible for the reductions seen in 1-naphthyl sulfate accumulation. Our data also suggest that constituents of pomegranate juice, most probably punicalagin, impair the enteric functions of sulfoconjugation and that this might have effects upon the bioavailability of drugs and other compounds present in food and in the environment. These effects might be related to the anticarcinogenic properties of pomegranate juice.

KW - Caco-2

KW - Pomegranate

KW - Sulfoconjugation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=57349144983&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=57349144983&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1089/jmf.2007.0050

DO - 10.1089/jmf.2007.0050

M3 - Article

VL - 11

SP - 623

EP - 628

JO - Journal of Medicinal Food

JF - Journal of Medicinal Food

SN - 1096-620X

IS - 4

ER -