Portable membrane protein chip: Development of membrane protein sensors for environment analysis

Ryuji Kawano, Yutaro Tsuji, Toshihisa Osaki, Koki Kamiya, Norihisa Miki, Yoke Tanaka, Shoji Takeuchi

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This paper describes a portable measurement system using membrane proteins (receptors) for environment analysis (Figure 1). Creatures sense ambient stimulations as eyesight, smell, taste, and so on, using recipient cells with the receptors in the cell membrane. If those congenital sensing mechanism is exploitable in an artificial system, the bio-inspired system will be applied for ultrahigh sensitive and selective sensors. For developing this sensor, we have addressed the stable and the reliable bilayer lipid membrane (BLM) as a platform for the membrane proteins. Double-well chamber with the parylene micropore that has the Ag/AgCl electrodes on the bottom of the chamber allows us to make the portable BLM device. As the results, we demonstrate the channel current recordings of the membrane protein using our portable BLM system at an extreme environment (at the summit of Mt. Fuji, Figure 2a). This proves that our system can be brought the higher mountain and measured the signals in wild environments.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 16th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2012
PublisherChemical and Biological Microsystems Society
Pages845-847
Number of pages3
ISBN (Print)9780979806452
Publication statusPublished - 2012
Event16th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2012 - Okinawa, Japan
Duration: 2012 Oct 282012 Nov 1

Other

Other16th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2012
CountryJapan
CityOkinawa
Period12/10/2812/11/1

Fingerprint

Lipid bilayers
Membrane Lipids
Membrane Proteins
Proteins
Membranes
Sensors
Cell membranes
Electrodes

Keywords

  • Biosensors
  • Lipid bilayer
  • Membrane proteins
  • MEMS
  • Portable system

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemical Engineering (miscellaneous)
  • Bioengineering

Cite this

Kawano, R., Tsuji, Y., Osaki, T., Kamiya, K., Miki, N., Tanaka, Y., & Takeuchi, S. (2012). Portable membrane protein chip: Development of membrane protein sensors for environment analysis. In Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2012 (pp. 845-847). Chemical and Biological Microsystems Society.

Portable membrane protein chip : Development of membrane protein sensors for environment analysis. / Kawano, Ryuji; Tsuji, Yutaro; Osaki, Toshihisa; Kamiya, Koki; Miki, Norihisa; Tanaka, Yoke; Takeuchi, Shoji.

Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2012. Chemical and Biological Microsystems Society, 2012. p. 845-847.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Kawano, R, Tsuji, Y, Osaki, T, Kamiya, K, Miki, N, Tanaka, Y & Takeuchi, S 2012, Portable membrane protein chip: Development of membrane protein sensors for environment analysis. in Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2012. Chemical and Biological Microsystems Society, pp. 845-847, 16th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2012, Okinawa, Japan, 12/10/28.
Kawano R, Tsuji Y, Osaki T, Kamiya K, Miki N, Tanaka Y et al. Portable membrane protein chip: Development of membrane protein sensors for environment analysis. In Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2012. Chemical and Biological Microsystems Society. 2012. p. 845-847
Kawano, Ryuji ; Tsuji, Yutaro ; Osaki, Toshihisa ; Kamiya, Koki ; Miki, Norihisa ; Tanaka, Yoke ; Takeuchi, Shoji. / Portable membrane protein chip : Development of membrane protein sensors for environment analysis. Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2012. Chemical and Biological Microsystems Society, 2012. pp. 845-847
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