Postoperative Hyperbilirubinemia Suggests the Occurrence of Complications After Esophagectomy for Esophageal Cancer

Tomoko Takesue, Hiroya Takeuchi, Kazumasa Fukuda, Rieko Nakamura, Tsunehiro Takahashi, Norihito Wada, Hirofumi Kawakubo, Yoshiro Saikawa, Tai Omori, Yuukou Kitagawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Serum bilirubin levels frequently increase after esophagectomy for esophageal cancer. Several studies have reported hyperbilirubinemia in patients with postoperative complications. We aimed to perform a detailed large-scale analysis to clarify this association.

Methods: We compared postoperative serum bilirubin levels of 200 patients with esophageal cancer who underwent esophagectomy, with and without postoperative complications, from January 2008 to July 2013 at Keio University Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. We also analyzed other risk factors for postoperative hyperbilirubinemia by univariate and multivariate analyses in an attempt to determine the mechanism of postoperative hyperbilirubinemia.

Results: Hyperbilirubinemia (total bilirubin >2.0 mg/dL) occurred in 71 patients (35.5 %). The mean total bilirubin peak level was 1.5 mg/dL in patients without complications, 2.0 mg/dL in those with at least one complication, 2.1 mg/dL in those with pneumonia, and 2.3 mg/dL in those with anastomotic leakage. Bilirubin levels were significantly higher in each complication group than in the non-complication group (p < 0.05 for all). Risk factors of postoperative hyperbilirubinemia by univariate analysis were the preoperative bilirubin level, video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery, three-field lymph node dissection, thoracic duct resection, prolonged surgical duration, severe complications (Clavien–Dindo grade ≥3), and severe anastomotic leakage (Clavien–Dindo grade ≥3). In contrast, the pT factor and postoperative enteral nutrition were negatively associated with postoperative hyperbilirubinemia. Risk factors by multivariate analysis were the preoperative bilirubin level, prolonged surgical duration, severe complications, and postoperative enteral nutrition.

Conclusions: Although various factors impact postoperative hyperbilirubinemia, postoperative complications were most significantly associated with postoperative hyperbilirubinemia. Patients with postoperative hyperbilirubinemia after esophagectomy must be managed more carefully because unnoticed complications may be associated with hyperbilirubinemia.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPresentations from the 9th Annual Electric Utilities Environmental Conference
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2015 Jan 9

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Hyperbilirubinemia
Esophagectomy
Esophageal Neoplasms
Bilirubin
Anastomotic Leak
Enteral Nutrition
Multivariate Analysis
Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgery
Thoracic Duct
Tokyo
Lymph Node Excision
Serum
Statistical Factor Analysis
Pneumonia
Japan

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Postoperative Hyperbilirubinemia Suggests the Occurrence of Complications After Esophagectomy for Esophageal Cancer. / Takesue, Tomoko; Takeuchi, Hiroya; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Nakamura, Rieko; Takahashi, Tsunehiro; Wada, Norihito; Kawakubo, Hirofumi; Saikawa, Yoshiro; Omori, Tai; Kitagawa, Yuukou.

In: Presentations from the 9th Annual Electric Utilities Environmental Conference, 09.01.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: Serum bilirubin levels frequently increase after esophagectomy for esophageal cancer. Several studies have reported hyperbilirubinemia in patients with postoperative complications. We aimed to perform a detailed large-scale analysis to clarify this association.Methods: We compared postoperative serum bilirubin levels of 200 patients with esophageal cancer who underwent esophagectomy, with and without postoperative complications, from January 2008 to July 2013 at Keio University Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. We also analyzed other risk factors for postoperative hyperbilirubinemia by univariate and multivariate analyses in an attempt to determine the mechanism of postoperative hyperbilirubinemia.Results: Hyperbilirubinemia (total bilirubin >2.0 mg/dL) occurred in 71 patients (35.5 {\%}). The mean total bilirubin peak level was 1.5 mg/dL in patients without complications, 2.0 mg/dL in those with at least one complication, 2.1 mg/dL in those with pneumonia, and 2.3 mg/dL in those with anastomotic leakage. Bilirubin levels were significantly higher in each complication group than in the non-complication group (p < 0.05 for all). Risk factors of postoperative hyperbilirubinemia by univariate analysis were the preoperative bilirubin level, video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery, three-field lymph node dissection, thoracic duct resection, prolonged surgical duration, severe complications (Clavien–Dindo grade ≥3), and severe anastomotic leakage (Clavien–Dindo grade ≥3). In contrast, the pT factor and postoperative enteral nutrition were negatively associated with postoperative hyperbilirubinemia. Risk factors by multivariate analysis were the preoperative bilirubin level, prolonged surgical duration, severe complications, and postoperative enteral nutrition.Conclusions: Although various factors impact postoperative hyperbilirubinemia, postoperative complications were most significantly associated with postoperative hyperbilirubinemia. Patients with postoperative hyperbilirubinemia after esophagectomy must be managed more carefully because unnoticed complications may be associated with hyperbilirubinemia.",
author = "Tomoko Takesue and Hiroya Takeuchi and Kazumasa Fukuda and Rieko Nakamura and Tsunehiro Takahashi and Norihito Wada and Hirofumi Kawakubo and Yoshiro Saikawa and Tai Omori and Yuukou Kitagawa",
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AU - Takesue, Tomoko

AU - Takeuchi, Hiroya

AU - Fukuda, Kazumasa

AU - Nakamura, Rieko

AU - Takahashi, Tsunehiro

AU - Wada, Norihito

AU - Kawakubo, Hirofumi

AU - Saikawa, Yoshiro

AU - Omori, Tai

AU - Kitagawa, Yuukou

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N2 - Background: Serum bilirubin levels frequently increase after esophagectomy for esophageal cancer. Several studies have reported hyperbilirubinemia in patients with postoperative complications. We aimed to perform a detailed large-scale analysis to clarify this association.Methods: We compared postoperative serum bilirubin levels of 200 patients with esophageal cancer who underwent esophagectomy, with and without postoperative complications, from January 2008 to July 2013 at Keio University Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. We also analyzed other risk factors for postoperative hyperbilirubinemia by univariate and multivariate analyses in an attempt to determine the mechanism of postoperative hyperbilirubinemia.Results: Hyperbilirubinemia (total bilirubin >2.0 mg/dL) occurred in 71 patients (35.5 %). The mean total bilirubin peak level was 1.5 mg/dL in patients without complications, 2.0 mg/dL in those with at least one complication, 2.1 mg/dL in those with pneumonia, and 2.3 mg/dL in those with anastomotic leakage. Bilirubin levels were significantly higher in each complication group than in the non-complication group (p < 0.05 for all). Risk factors of postoperative hyperbilirubinemia by univariate analysis were the preoperative bilirubin level, video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery, three-field lymph node dissection, thoracic duct resection, prolonged surgical duration, severe complications (Clavien–Dindo grade ≥3), and severe anastomotic leakage (Clavien–Dindo grade ≥3). In contrast, the pT factor and postoperative enteral nutrition were negatively associated with postoperative hyperbilirubinemia. Risk factors by multivariate analysis were the preoperative bilirubin level, prolonged surgical duration, severe complications, and postoperative enteral nutrition.Conclusions: Although various factors impact postoperative hyperbilirubinemia, postoperative complications were most significantly associated with postoperative hyperbilirubinemia. Patients with postoperative hyperbilirubinemia after esophagectomy must be managed more carefully because unnoticed complications may be associated with hyperbilirubinemia.

AB - Background: Serum bilirubin levels frequently increase after esophagectomy for esophageal cancer. Several studies have reported hyperbilirubinemia in patients with postoperative complications. We aimed to perform a detailed large-scale analysis to clarify this association.Methods: We compared postoperative serum bilirubin levels of 200 patients with esophageal cancer who underwent esophagectomy, with and without postoperative complications, from January 2008 to July 2013 at Keio University Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. We also analyzed other risk factors for postoperative hyperbilirubinemia by univariate and multivariate analyses in an attempt to determine the mechanism of postoperative hyperbilirubinemia.Results: Hyperbilirubinemia (total bilirubin >2.0 mg/dL) occurred in 71 patients (35.5 %). The mean total bilirubin peak level was 1.5 mg/dL in patients without complications, 2.0 mg/dL in those with at least one complication, 2.1 mg/dL in those with pneumonia, and 2.3 mg/dL in those with anastomotic leakage. Bilirubin levels were significantly higher in each complication group than in the non-complication group (p < 0.05 for all). Risk factors of postoperative hyperbilirubinemia by univariate analysis were the preoperative bilirubin level, video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery, three-field lymph node dissection, thoracic duct resection, prolonged surgical duration, severe complications (Clavien–Dindo grade ≥3), and severe anastomotic leakage (Clavien–Dindo grade ≥3). In contrast, the pT factor and postoperative enteral nutrition were negatively associated with postoperative hyperbilirubinemia. Risk factors by multivariate analysis were the preoperative bilirubin level, prolonged surgical duration, severe complications, and postoperative enteral nutrition.Conclusions: Although various factors impact postoperative hyperbilirubinemia, postoperative complications were most significantly associated with postoperative hyperbilirubinemia. Patients with postoperative hyperbilirubinemia after esophagectomy must be managed more carefully because unnoticed complications may be associated with hyperbilirubinemia.

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