Potential of thermal and mixing stratification for reducing pressure-rise rates in HCCI engines

Kenji Shigetoyo, Mari Nagae, Akane Yoshida, Norimasa Iida

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential use of in-cylinder thermal and mixing stratification for reducing the pressure-rise rates in HCCI engines by going through numerical analysis with multi-zones modeling. The computations are conducted using both a standard single-zone and the custom multi-zone version of the Senkin application of the CHEMKIN II kinetics rate code, and kinetic mechanisms for Di-Methyl Ether (DME). The objective of calculation with the multi-zones model is to examine the mechanism of thermal and mixing stratified charge to reduce an excessive pressure-rise rates. The mechanism of reducing the pressure-rise rates in the thermal and mixing stratified charge is proved with 2-zones and 5-zones model. It is found that thermal and mixing stratification have the effect of reducing the pressure-rise rates (extended combustion duration) and have potential for extending the upper load limit in HCCI engines.

Original languageEnglish
Pages281-288
Number of pages8
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Dec 1
Event7th International Conference on Modeling and Diagnostics for Advanced Engine Systems, COMODIA 2008 - Sapporo, Japan
Duration: 2008 Jul 282008 Jul 31

Other

Other7th International Conference on Modeling and Diagnostics for Advanced Engine Systems, COMODIA 2008
CountryJapan
CitySapporo
Period08/7/2808/7/31

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Keywords

  • Mixing stratification
  • Numerical analysis
  • Pressure-rise rates
  • Thermal stratification

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Automotive Engineering
  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Modelling and Simulation

Cite this

Shigetoyo, K., Nagae, M., Yoshida, A., & Iida, N. (2008). Potential of thermal and mixing stratification for reducing pressure-rise rates in HCCI engines. 281-288. Paper presented at 7th International Conference on Modeling and Diagnostics for Advanced Engine Systems, COMODIA 2008, Sapporo, Japan.