Pre-treatment interleukin-6 levels strongly affect bone erosion progression and repair detected by magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatoid arthritis patients

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8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. To examine the relationship between MRI structural damage and repair and plasma inflammatory cytokines in patients with RA. Methods. A total of 88 newly diagnosed, untreated RA patients were enrolled. Contrast MRI of the dominant hand and X-rays of the hands and feet were performed at baseline and 1 year later. MR images were evaluated using RA MRI scoring, and X-raywere assessed by the modified total Sharp score. Erosion progression was defined as changes in RA MRI scoring erosion or modified total Sharp score erosion of >0.5. Erosion repair was defined as erosion score changes of less than -0.5. Plasma levels of 10 cytokines were measured by electrochemiluminescence assay. Results. Progression of bone erosion and repair were observed more frequently in MRI than in X-rays (erosion, 52% vs 26%, P < 0.001; repair, 26% vs 15%, P = 0.003, respectively). Baseline IL-6 levels and seropositivity were independent relevant factors for MRI erosion progression, with IL-6 having stronger effect than seropositivity. A receiver operating characteristic curve identified the baseline IL-6 level of 7.6 pg/ml for predicting erosion progression during 1 year, with an area under the curve of 0.82; higher IL-6 levels resulted in more erosion progression. Baseline low IL-6 was also an independent predictor for MRI erosion repair. Conclusion. In newly diagnosed, untreated RA patients, baseline plasma IL-6 levels are responsible for 1-year MRI bone erosion progression and repair.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1089-1094
Number of pages6
JournalRheumatology (United Kingdom)
Volume56
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Jul 1

Fingerprint

Interleukin-6
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Bone and Bones
Therapeutics
Hand
X-Rays
Cytokines
ROC Curve
Area Under Curve
Foot

Keywords

  • Bone erosion
  • Cytokines
  • IL-6
  • Magnetic resonance imaging
  • Repair
  • Rheumatoid arthritis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

@article{6e01bf37140048339edfdcc25d49888d,
title = "Pre-treatment interleukin-6 levels strongly affect bone erosion progression and repair detected by magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatoid arthritis patients",
abstract = "Objective. To examine the relationship between MRI structural damage and repair and plasma inflammatory cytokines in patients with RA. Methods. A total of 88 newly diagnosed, untreated RA patients were enrolled. Contrast MRI of the dominant hand and X-rays of the hands and feet were performed at baseline and 1 year later. MR images were evaluated using RA MRI scoring, and X-raywere assessed by the modified total Sharp score. Erosion progression was defined as changes in RA MRI scoring erosion or modified total Sharp score erosion of >0.5. Erosion repair was defined as erosion score changes of less than -0.5. Plasma levels of 10 cytokines were measured by electrochemiluminescence assay. Results. Progression of bone erosion and repair were observed more frequently in MRI than in X-rays (erosion, 52{\%} vs 26{\%}, P < 0.001; repair, 26{\%} vs 15{\%}, P = 0.003, respectively). Baseline IL-6 levels and seropositivity were independent relevant factors for MRI erosion progression, with IL-6 having stronger effect than seropositivity. A receiver operating characteristic curve identified the baseline IL-6 level of 7.6 pg/ml for predicting erosion progression during 1 year, with an area under the curve of 0.82; higher IL-6 levels resulted in more erosion progression. Baseline low IL-6 was also an independent predictor for MRI erosion repair. Conclusion. In newly diagnosed, untreated RA patients, baseline plasma IL-6 levels are responsible for 1-year MRI bone erosion progression and repair.",
keywords = "Bone erosion, Cytokines, IL-6, Magnetic resonance imaging, Repair, Rheumatoid arthritis",
author = "Yasushi Kondo and Yuko Kaneko and Hiroaki Sugiura and Shunsuke Matsumoto and Naoshi Nishina and Masataka Kuwana and Masahiro Jinzaki and Tsutomu Takeuchi",
year = "2017",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1093/rheumatology/kex046",
language = "English",
volume = "56",
pages = "1089--1094",
journal = "Rheumatology (United Kingdom)",
issn = "1462-0324",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "7",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Pre-treatment interleukin-6 levels strongly affect bone erosion progression and repair detected by magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatoid arthritis patients

AU - Kondo, Yasushi

AU - Kaneko, Yuko

AU - Sugiura, Hiroaki

AU - Matsumoto, Shunsuke

AU - Nishina, Naoshi

AU - Kuwana, Masataka

AU - Jinzaki, Masahiro

AU - Takeuchi, Tsutomu

PY - 2017/7/1

Y1 - 2017/7/1

N2 - Objective. To examine the relationship between MRI structural damage and repair and plasma inflammatory cytokines in patients with RA. Methods. A total of 88 newly diagnosed, untreated RA patients were enrolled. Contrast MRI of the dominant hand and X-rays of the hands and feet were performed at baseline and 1 year later. MR images were evaluated using RA MRI scoring, and X-raywere assessed by the modified total Sharp score. Erosion progression was defined as changes in RA MRI scoring erosion or modified total Sharp score erosion of >0.5. Erosion repair was defined as erosion score changes of less than -0.5. Plasma levels of 10 cytokines were measured by electrochemiluminescence assay. Results. Progression of bone erosion and repair were observed more frequently in MRI than in X-rays (erosion, 52% vs 26%, P < 0.001; repair, 26% vs 15%, P = 0.003, respectively). Baseline IL-6 levels and seropositivity were independent relevant factors for MRI erosion progression, with IL-6 having stronger effect than seropositivity. A receiver operating characteristic curve identified the baseline IL-6 level of 7.6 pg/ml for predicting erosion progression during 1 year, with an area under the curve of 0.82; higher IL-6 levels resulted in more erosion progression. Baseline low IL-6 was also an independent predictor for MRI erosion repair. Conclusion. In newly diagnosed, untreated RA patients, baseline plasma IL-6 levels are responsible for 1-year MRI bone erosion progression and repair.

AB - Objective. To examine the relationship between MRI structural damage and repair and plasma inflammatory cytokines in patients with RA. Methods. A total of 88 newly diagnosed, untreated RA patients were enrolled. Contrast MRI of the dominant hand and X-rays of the hands and feet were performed at baseline and 1 year later. MR images were evaluated using RA MRI scoring, and X-raywere assessed by the modified total Sharp score. Erosion progression was defined as changes in RA MRI scoring erosion or modified total Sharp score erosion of >0.5. Erosion repair was defined as erosion score changes of less than -0.5. Plasma levels of 10 cytokines were measured by electrochemiluminescence assay. Results. Progression of bone erosion and repair were observed more frequently in MRI than in X-rays (erosion, 52% vs 26%, P < 0.001; repair, 26% vs 15%, P = 0.003, respectively). Baseline IL-6 levels and seropositivity were independent relevant factors for MRI erosion progression, with IL-6 having stronger effect than seropositivity. A receiver operating characteristic curve identified the baseline IL-6 level of 7.6 pg/ml for predicting erosion progression during 1 year, with an area under the curve of 0.82; higher IL-6 levels resulted in more erosion progression. Baseline low IL-6 was also an independent predictor for MRI erosion repair. Conclusion. In newly diagnosed, untreated RA patients, baseline plasma IL-6 levels are responsible for 1-year MRI bone erosion progression and repair.

KW - Bone erosion

KW - Cytokines

KW - IL-6

KW - Magnetic resonance imaging

KW - Repair

KW - Rheumatoid arthritis

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