Predictive values of egg-specific IgE by two commonly used assay systems for the diagnosis of egg allergy in young children: a prospective multicenter study

IPAD3g investigators

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Specific IgE (sIgE) is often used to predict oral food challenge (OFC) outcomes in food allergy, but interpretation of the results may vary depending on the assay method employed and the patient population tested. The aim of this study was to use two commercial assay systems to determine egg-sIgE values predictive of allergy within the most common populations treated at pediatric clinics. Methods: In a multicenter prospective study, 433 children with suspected or confirmed egg allergy underwent oral challenge (OFC) using cooked egg (CE) and raw egg (RE) powders to diagnose either true allergy in 1-year-old (group A, n = 220) or tolerance in 2- to 6-year-old (group B, n = 213). Egg white (EW)- and ovomucoid (OM)-sIgE values were measured using the ImmunoCAP ® sIgE (ImmunoCAP) and the IMMULITE ® 2000 3 gAllergy (3gAllergy) systems. Children were recruited from six primary care clinics and 18 hospitals in Japan. Results: Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis yielded similar areas under the curve (AUC) for the two assays (0.7–0.8). The optimal cutoff values and the probability curves (PCs) of the sIgE by the two assays to predict CE and RE OFC outcomes were determined for both groups. Values for 3gAllergy were higher than for ImmunoCAP; however, correlation of sIgE and predicted probability calculated by PCs were strong between the two methods. Conclusions: Cutoff values and PCs for egg-sIgE established using both ImmunoCAP and 3gAllergy may be useful for predicting egg allergy in early childhood patient populations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1435-1443
Number of pages9
JournalAllergy: European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Volume71
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Oct 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Egg Hypersensitivity
Immunoglobulin E
Multicenter Studies
Ovum
Prospective Studies
Food
Hypersensitivity
Ovomucin
Population
Egg White
Food Hypersensitivity
ROC Curve
Powders
Area Under Curve
Primary Health Care
Japan
Pediatrics

Keywords

  • egg allergy
  • oral food challenge
  • predictive value
  • probability curve
  • specific IgE

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

@article{3e7207dbad4f4b52aca79b57960c3288,
title = "Predictive values of egg-specific IgE by two commonly used assay systems for the diagnosis of egg allergy in young children: a prospective multicenter study",
abstract = "Background: Specific IgE (sIgE) is often used to predict oral food challenge (OFC) outcomes in food allergy, but interpretation of the results may vary depending on the assay method employed and the patient population tested. The aim of this study was to use two commercial assay systems to determine egg-sIgE values predictive of allergy within the most common populations treated at pediatric clinics. Methods: In a multicenter prospective study, 433 children with suspected or confirmed egg allergy underwent oral challenge (OFC) using cooked egg (CE) and raw egg (RE) powders to diagnose either true allergy in 1-year-old (group A, n = 220) or tolerance in 2- to 6-year-old (group B, n = 213). Egg white (EW)- and ovomucoid (OM)-sIgE values were measured using the ImmunoCAP {\circledR} sIgE (ImmunoCAP) and the IMMULITE {\circledR} 2000 3 gAllergy ™ (3gAllergy) systems. Children were recruited from six primary care clinics and 18 hospitals in Japan. Results: Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis yielded similar areas under the curve (AUC) for the two assays (0.7–0.8). The optimal cutoff values and the probability curves (PCs) of the sIgE by the two assays to predict CE and RE OFC outcomes were determined for both groups. Values for 3gAllergy were higher than for ImmunoCAP; however, correlation of sIgE and predicted probability calculated by PCs were strong between the two methods. Conclusions: Cutoff values and PCs for egg-sIgE established using both ImmunoCAP and 3gAllergy may be useful for predicting egg allergy in early childhood patient populations.",
keywords = "egg allergy, oral food challenge, predictive value, probability curve, specific IgE",
author = "{IPAD3g investigators} and K. Furuya and M. Nagao and Yasunori Sato and S. Ito and T. Fujisawa and Keigo Kainuma and Junya Hirayama and Yu Kuwabara and Takahiro Ito and Mari Morimoto and Atsushi Yamashita and Jun Atsuta and Chiho Tatsumoto and Tatsuki Fukuie and Ryuhei Yasuoka and Masanori Ikeda and Kazuko Sugai and Kazuhiro Sekimoto and Reiko Tokuda and Toshio Katsunuma and Masako Watanabe and Hiroyuki Kojima and Yutaka Suehiro and Yukiko Hiraguchi and Yuko Ebishima and Saeko Simodera and Shouko Yoshino and Satoshi Sato and Miki Sato and Tae Hijikata and Tomoko Otani and Takahisa Mizuno and Yasuhiro Shimauchi and Tetsuro Kitamura and Michimasa Fujiwara and Kazumi Hiraba and Kenichi Tokuyama and Eiji Morita and Hiroko Murasugi and Kazunobu Ouchi and Tokio Wakabayashi and Sahoko Ono and Hiroshi Nakano and Hiroyasu Okahata and Toshimi Nakamura and Yoko Yamashita and Hiroshi Tachimoto and Yuko Otani and Mayumi Sugimoto and Hidetsugu Mizuuchi",
year = "2016",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/all.12912",
language = "English",
volume = "71",
pages = "1435--1443",
journal = "Allergy: European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology",
issn = "0105-4538",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Predictive values of egg-specific IgE by two commonly used assay systems for the diagnosis of egg allergy in young children

T2 - a prospective multicenter study

AU - IPAD3g investigators

AU - Furuya, K.

AU - Nagao, M.

AU - Sato, Yasunori

AU - Ito, S.

AU - Fujisawa, T.

AU - Kainuma, Keigo

AU - Hirayama, Junya

AU - Kuwabara, Yu

AU - Ito, Takahiro

AU - Morimoto, Mari

AU - Yamashita, Atsushi

AU - Atsuta, Jun

AU - Tatsumoto, Chiho

AU - Fukuie, Tatsuki

AU - Yasuoka, Ryuhei

AU - Ikeda, Masanori

AU - Sugai, Kazuko

AU - Sekimoto, Kazuhiro

AU - Tokuda, Reiko

AU - Katsunuma, Toshio

AU - Watanabe, Masako

AU - Kojima, Hiroyuki

AU - Suehiro, Yutaka

AU - Hiraguchi, Yukiko

AU - Ebishima, Yuko

AU - Simodera, Saeko

AU - Yoshino, Shouko

AU - Sato, Satoshi

AU - Sato, Miki

AU - Hijikata, Tae

AU - Otani, Tomoko

AU - Mizuno, Takahisa

AU - Shimauchi, Yasuhiro

AU - Kitamura, Tetsuro

AU - Fujiwara, Michimasa

AU - Hiraba, Kazumi

AU - Tokuyama, Kenichi

AU - Morita, Eiji

AU - Murasugi, Hiroko

AU - Ouchi, Kazunobu

AU - Wakabayashi, Tokio

AU - Ono, Sahoko

AU - Nakano, Hiroshi

AU - Okahata, Hiroyasu

AU - Nakamura, Toshimi

AU - Yamashita, Yoko

AU - Tachimoto, Hiroshi

AU - Otani, Yuko

AU - Sugimoto, Mayumi

AU - Mizuuchi, Hidetsugu

PY - 2016/10/1

Y1 - 2016/10/1

N2 - Background: Specific IgE (sIgE) is often used to predict oral food challenge (OFC) outcomes in food allergy, but interpretation of the results may vary depending on the assay method employed and the patient population tested. The aim of this study was to use two commercial assay systems to determine egg-sIgE values predictive of allergy within the most common populations treated at pediatric clinics. Methods: In a multicenter prospective study, 433 children with suspected or confirmed egg allergy underwent oral challenge (OFC) using cooked egg (CE) and raw egg (RE) powders to diagnose either true allergy in 1-year-old (group A, n = 220) or tolerance in 2- to 6-year-old (group B, n = 213). Egg white (EW)- and ovomucoid (OM)-sIgE values were measured using the ImmunoCAP ® sIgE (ImmunoCAP) and the IMMULITE ® 2000 3 gAllergy ™ (3gAllergy) systems. Children were recruited from six primary care clinics and 18 hospitals in Japan. Results: Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis yielded similar areas under the curve (AUC) for the two assays (0.7–0.8). The optimal cutoff values and the probability curves (PCs) of the sIgE by the two assays to predict CE and RE OFC outcomes were determined for both groups. Values for 3gAllergy were higher than for ImmunoCAP; however, correlation of sIgE and predicted probability calculated by PCs were strong between the two methods. Conclusions: Cutoff values and PCs for egg-sIgE established using both ImmunoCAP and 3gAllergy may be useful for predicting egg allergy in early childhood patient populations.

AB - Background: Specific IgE (sIgE) is often used to predict oral food challenge (OFC) outcomes in food allergy, but interpretation of the results may vary depending on the assay method employed and the patient population tested. The aim of this study was to use two commercial assay systems to determine egg-sIgE values predictive of allergy within the most common populations treated at pediatric clinics. Methods: In a multicenter prospective study, 433 children with suspected or confirmed egg allergy underwent oral challenge (OFC) using cooked egg (CE) and raw egg (RE) powders to diagnose either true allergy in 1-year-old (group A, n = 220) or tolerance in 2- to 6-year-old (group B, n = 213). Egg white (EW)- and ovomucoid (OM)-sIgE values were measured using the ImmunoCAP ® sIgE (ImmunoCAP) and the IMMULITE ® 2000 3 gAllergy ™ (3gAllergy) systems. Children were recruited from six primary care clinics and 18 hospitals in Japan. Results: Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis yielded similar areas under the curve (AUC) for the two assays (0.7–0.8). The optimal cutoff values and the probability curves (PCs) of the sIgE by the two assays to predict CE and RE OFC outcomes were determined for both groups. Values for 3gAllergy were higher than for ImmunoCAP; however, correlation of sIgE and predicted probability calculated by PCs were strong between the two methods. Conclusions: Cutoff values and PCs for egg-sIgE established using both ImmunoCAP and 3gAllergy may be useful for predicting egg allergy in early childhood patient populations.

KW - egg allergy

KW - oral food challenge

KW - predictive value

KW - probability curve

KW - specific IgE

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U2 - 10.1111/all.12912

DO - 10.1111/all.12912

M3 - Article

C2 - 27061295

AN - SCOPUS:84978884317

VL - 71

SP - 1435

EP - 1443

JO - Allergy: European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology

JF - Allergy: European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology

SN - 0105-4538

IS - 10

ER -