Prepregnancy assessment of liver function to predict perinatal and postpregnancy outcomes in biliary atresia patients with native liver

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Abstract

Considering that some biliary atresia (BA) survivors with native liver have reached reproductive age and face long‐lasting complications, specific attention needs to be paid to pregnant cases. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between liver function, perinatal outcomes, and prognosis. A database review was conducted to identify pregnant BA cases with native liver and perinatal data, and clinical information on BA‐related complications was analyzed. Perinatal serum cholinesterase (ChE) levels, model for end‐stage liver‐disease (MELD) score, and platelet trends were analyzed, and the association between these indicators and perinatal outcomes was investigated. Patients were categorized into three groups according to the perinatal clinical outcomes: favorable (term babies with or without several episodes of cholangitis; n = 3), borderline (term baby and following liver dysfunction; n = 1), and unfavorable (premature delivery with subsequent liver failure; n = 1). Lower serum ChE levels, lower platelet counts, and higher MELD scores were observed in the unfavorable category. Borderline and unfavorable patients displayed a continuous increase in MELD score, with one eventually needing a liver transplantation. Pregnancy in patients with BA requires special attention. Serum ChE levels, platelet counts, and MELD scores are all important markers for predicting perinatal prognosis.

Original languageEnglish
Article number3956
JournalJournal of Clinical Medicine
Volume10
Issue number17
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 Sep 1

Keywords

  • Biliary atresia
  • Chorine esterase
  • Liver transplantation
  • MELD score
  • Pregnancy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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