Pressure-assisted capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for analysis of multivalent anions

Tomoyoshi Soga, Yuki Ueno, Hisako Naraoka, Keiko Matsuda, Masaru Tomita, Takaaki Nishioka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

117 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We describe a method, based on pressure-assisted capillary electrophoresis coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (PACE/ESI-MS), that allows the simultaneous and quantitative analysis of multivalent anions, such as citrate isomers, nucleotides, nicotinamideadenine dinucleotides, and flavin adenine dinucleotide, and coenzyme A (CoA) compounds. Key to the analysis was using a noncharged polymer, poly(dimethylsiloxane), coated to the inner surface of the capillary to prevent anionic species from adsorbing onto the capillary wall. It was also necessary to drive a constant liquid flow toward the MS by applying air pressure to the inlet capillary during electrophoresis to maintain a conductive liquid junction between the capillary and the electrospray needle. Although theoretical plates were inferior to those obtained by CE/ESI-MS using a cationic polymer-coated capillary, the PACE/ESI-MS method improved reproducibility and sensitivity of these anions. Eighteen anions were separated by PACE and selectively detected by a quadrupole mass spectrometer with a sheath-flow electrospray ionization interface. The relative standard deviations (n = 6) of the method were better than 0.6% for migration times and between 1.4% and 6.2% for peak areas. The detection limits for these species were between 0.4 and 3.7 μmol/L with pressure injection of 50 mbar for 30 s (30 nL), that is, mass detection limits calculated in the range from 12 to 110 fmol at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. The utility of the method was demonstrated by analysis of Citrate isomers, nucleotides, dinucleotides, and CoA compounds extracted from Bacillus subtilis cells.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)6224-6229
Number of pages6
JournalAnalytical Chemistry
Volume74
Issue number24
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002 Dec 15

Fingerprint

Capillary electrophoresis
Electrospray ionization
Anions
Mass spectrometry
Coenzyme A
Citric Acid
Isomers
Polymers
Nucleotides
Flavin-Adenine Dinucleotide
Liquids
Mass spectrometers
Bacilli
Needles
Signal to noise ratio
Air
Chemical analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry

Cite this

Pressure-assisted capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for analysis of multivalent anions. / Soga, Tomoyoshi; Ueno, Yuki; Naraoka, Hisako; Matsuda, Keiko; Tomita, Masaru; Nishioka, Takaaki.

In: Analytical Chemistry, Vol. 74, No. 24, 15.12.2002, p. 6224-6229.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Soga, Tomoyoshi ; Ueno, Yuki ; Naraoka, Hisako ; Matsuda, Keiko ; Tomita, Masaru ; Nishioka, Takaaki. / Pressure-assisted capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for analysis of multivalent anions. In: Analytical Chemistry. 2002 ; Vol. 74, No. 24. pp. 6224-6229.
@article{387681b95b254d79815e6765dcb88b6d,
title = "Pressure-assisted capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for analysis of multivalent anions",
abstract = "We describe a method, based on pressure-assisted capillary electrophoresis coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (PACE/ESI-MS), that allows the simultaneous and quantitative analysis of multivalent anions, such as citrate isomers, nucleotides, nicotinamideadenine dinucleotides, and flavin adenine dinucleotide, and coenzyme A (CoA) compounds. Key to the analysis was using a noncharged polymer, poly(dimethylsiloxane), coated to the inner surface of the capillary to prevent anionic species from adsorbing onto the capillary wall. It was also necessary to drive a constant liquid flow toward the MS by applying air pressure to the inlet capillary during electrophoresis to maintain a conductive liquid junction between the capillary and the electrospray needle. Although theoretical plates were inferior to those obtained by CE/ESI-MS using a cationic polymer-coated capillary, the PACE/ESI-MS method improved reproducibility and sensitivity of these anions. Eighteen anions were separated by PACE and selectively detected by a quadrupole mass spectrometer with a sheath-flow electrospray ionization interface. The relative standard deviations (n = 6) of the method were better than 0.6{\%} for migration times and between 1.4{\%} and 6.2{\%} for peak areas. The detection limits for these species were between 0.4 and 3.7 μmol/L with pressure injection of 50 mbar for 30 s (30 nL), that is, mass detection limits calculated in the range from 12 to 110 fmol at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. The utility of the method was demonstrated by analysis of Citrate isomers, nucleotides, dinucleotides, and CoA compounds extracted from Bacillus subtilis cells.",
author = "Tomoyoshi Soga and Yuki Ueno and Hisako Naraoka and Keiko Matsuda and Masaru Tomita and Takaaki Nishioka",
year = "2002",
month = "12",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1021/ac0202684",
language = "English",
volume = "74",
pages = "6224--6229",
journal = "Analytical Chemistry",
issn = "0003-2700",
publisher = "American Chemical Society",
number = "24",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Pressure-assisted capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for analysis of multivalent anions

AU - Soga, Tomoyoshi

AU - Ueno, Yuki

AU - Naraoka, Hisako

AU - Matsuda, Keiko

AU - Tomita, Masaru

AU - Nishioka, Takaaki

PY - 2002/12/15

Y1 - 2002/12/15

N2 - We describe a method, based on pressure-assisted capillary electrophoresis coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (PACE/ESI-MS), that allows the simultaneous and quantitative analysis of multivalent anions, such as citrate isomers, nucleotides, nicotinamideadenine dinucleotides, and flavin adenine dinucleotide, and coenzyme A (CoA) compounds. Key to the analysis was using a noncharged polymer, poly(dimethylsiloxane), coated to the inner surface of the capillary to prevent anionic species from adsorbing onto the capillary wall. It was also necessary to drive a constant liquid flow toward the MS by applying air pressure to the inlet capillary during electrophoresis to maintain a conductive liquid junction between the capillary and the electrospray needle. Although theoretical plates were inferior to those obtained by CE/ESI-MS using a cationic polymer-coated capillary, the PACE/ESI-MS method improved reproducibility and sensitivity of these anions. Eighteen anions were separated by PACE and selectively detected by a quadrupole mass spectrometer with a sheath-flow electrospray ionization interface. The relative standard deviations (n = 6) of the method were better than 0.6% for migration times and between 1.4% and 6.2% for peak areas. The detection limits for these species were between 0.4 and 3.7 μmol/L with pressure injection of 50 mbar for 30 s (30 nL), that is, mass detection limits calculated in the range from 12 to 110 fmol at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. The utility of the method was demonstrated by analysis of Citrate isomers, nucleotides, dinucleotides, and CoA compounds extracted from Bacillus subtilis cells.

AB - We describe a method, based on pressure-assisted capillary electrophoresis coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (PACE/ESI-MS), that allows the simultaneous and quantitative analysis of multivalent anions, such as citrate isomers, nucleotides, nicotinamideadenine dinucleotides, and flavin adenine dinucleotide, and coenzyme A (CoA) compounds. Key to the analysis was using a noncharged polymer, poly(dimethylsiloxane), coated to the inner surface of the capillary to prevent anionic species from adsorbing onto the capillary wall. It was also necessary to drive a constant liquid flow toward the MS by applying air pressure to the inlet capillary during electrophoresis to maintain a conductive liquid junction between the capillary and the electrospray needle. Although theoretical plates were inferior to those obtained by CE/ESI-MS using a cationic polymer-coated capillary, the PACE/ESI-MS method improved reproducibility and sensitivity of these anions. Eighteen anions were separated by PACE and selectively detected by a quadrupole mass spectrometer with a sheath-flow electrospray ionization interface. The relative standard deviations (n = 6) of the method were better than 0.6% for migration times and between 1.4% and 6.2% for peak areas. The detection limits for these species were between 0.4 and 3.7 μmol/L with pressure injection of 50 mbar for 30 s (30 nL), that is, mass detection limits calculated in the range from 12 to 110 fmol at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. The utility of the method was demonstrated by analysis of Citrate isomers, nucleotides, dinucleotides, and CoA compounds extracted from Bacillus subtilis cells.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0037115531&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0037115531&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1021/ac0202684

DO - 10.1021/ac0202684

M3 - Article

C2 - 12510742

AN - SCOPUS:0037115531

VL - 74

SP - 6224

EP - 6229

JO - Analytical Chemistry

JF - Analytical Chemistry

SN - 0003-2700

IS - 24

ER -